Caronavirus Dementia Care Home Covid-19 Carona Virus Information

Coronavirus: Information for people affected by dementia

From Alzheimer’s Society

Living with dementia at any time brings everyday challenges for the person and those around them.

Coronavirus is making daily life much harder.

You may feel anxious, scared or lonely.

But you are not alone – help is available.

During the coronavirus pandemic we have advice and practical tips for people living with dementia and those supporting them – either in the same household or from a distance.

Anyone affected by dementia can call  support line  on  0333 150 3456. Or, if you speak Welsh, you can call our Welsh-speaking support line on  03300 947 400.

You can also see our  full range of free publications  or use our online tool to  find dementia information and support.

We will update this information regularly, including details about how Alzheimer’s Society can help. This will provide support to help you get through this difficult time, so do come back to see what’s available.

About Coronavirus 

Coronavirus causes a new illness (COVID-19) that can affect your lungs and airways.

Symptoms in most people will be mild – a high temperature and persistent cough. Some people will also have difficulty with breathing (shortness of breath).

A few people with COVID-19 will get severe symptoms and need medical attention. Older people and those with a long-term health condition (for example, lung disease, heart failure, diabetes) or weakened immune system (for example, because of HIV or chemotherapy) are more likely to get worse symptoms. These are people who are offered the regular flu jab every year in the autumn.

The higher-risk groups for severe coronavirus illness include everyone with dementia, and many older family carers.

Advice for everyone

We must all do we can to fight coronavirus. It’s spread easily between people and not everyone with coronavirus infection has obvious symptoms.

To stop us catching or spreading the virus, the law now says that everyone must stay at home.

The only reasons to leave your home now are:

  • shopping for basic necessities – such as food and medicine
  • one form of exercise (a run, walk, or cycle each day) – alone or with members of your household
  • a medical need, to provide care or help a vulnerable person
  • travelling to and from work – where this absolutely cannot be done from home.

These rules apply to everyone in the UK.

Many people with dementia and those living with them have already been staying in.

This is because people with dementia and older people in general are at higher risk of severe illness if they catch coronavirus.

London Dementia Support Help Information

Dementia London

Sign up to receive NHS Dementia Information Service emails

Visit the Dementia Information Service, which guides you through the often difficult time after a dementia diagnosis.

The emails can support you if you have just found out, or accepted, that you or a loved one has dementia.

Sign up to receive 6 emails about getting the help you need, now and in the future

You will be sent a weekly email for 6 weeks, and occasionally other relevant health information via email (for example surveys about your use of the service)

NHS Website

View full Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy
Submit

Dementia emails week by week

Each week’s email will cover a different need-to-know topic, including:

Understanding dementia

Essential information about dementia, including what do to after a diagnosis and where to turn for advice.

Get the best dementia healthcare

Find out about the treatments available and how to get the most out of healthcare services.

Dementia at home

How to make sure someone with dementia is as comfortable as they can be at home, how to get help at home, and technology that can make life a bit easier.

Finance and legal

Advice on how to organise financial and legal affairs for someone with dementia, and how to make plans for the future.

Get the best social care

Information on what help is available from social services and how to get the most out of it.

Carers: looking after yourself

If you’re looking after someone with dementia, who’s looking after you?

Find out where to turn for help and support.

Please visit link below for official NHS website.

Dementia Information Service NHS

Sign up to receive NHS Dementia Information Service emails

Visit the Dementia Information Service, which guides you through the often difficult time after a dementia diagnosis.

The emails can support you if you have just found out, or accepted, that you or a loved one has dementia.

Sign up to receive 6 emails about getting the help you need, now and in the future

You will be sent a weekly email for 6 weeks, and occasionally other relevant health information via email (for example surveys about your use of the service)

NHS Website

View full Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy
Submit

Dementia emails week by week

Each week’s email will cover a different need-to-know topic, including:

Understanding dementia

Essential information about dementia, including what do to after a diagnosis and where to turn for advice.

Get the best dementia healthcare

Find out about the treatments available and how to get the most out of healthcare services.

Dementia at home

How to make sure someone with dementia is as comfortable as they can be at home, how to get help at home, and technology that can make life a bit easier.

Finance and legal

Advice on how to organise financial and legal affairs for someone with dementia, and how to make plans for the future.

Get the best social care

Information on what help is available from social services and how to get the most out of it.

Carers: looking after yourself

If you’re looking after someone with dementia, who’s looking after you?

Find out where to turn for help and support.

Please visit link below for official NHS website.

Birmingham Dementia Support Help Information

Birmingham Dementia

The Birmingham Dementia Roadmap provides high quality information about the dementia journey alongside local information about services, support groups and care pathways to assist primary care to support people with dementia and cognitive impairment, their families and carers.

The content is organised into topics to reflect the journey with dementia, from understanding dementia and being worried about your memory through to the diagnostic processpost diagnosis support and living well with dementia. There are also topics on carer health and planning for the future.

“Give me something to believe in” – Birmingham and Solihull Dementia Strategy 2014-17 

Launched in May 2014, the strategy has been developed on behalf of the Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) that cover Birmingham and Solihull as well as Birmingham City Council and Solihull Metropolitan Borough Council.

The strategy describes:

  • The services we think should be in place for people with dementia in Birmingham and Solihull and their carers;
  • The services currently in place; and
  • A framework for Birmingham and Solihull CCGs, Birmingham City Council and Solihull Metropolitan Borough Council to use when planning services

It has been developed using feedback gathered from people with dementia, their families and carers and draws upon a number of national strategic drivers including Living Well with Dementia, the National Dementia Strategy 2009, and The Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia – Delivering Major Improvements in Dementia Care and Research by 2015.

The Strategy covers the five main parts of our dementia pathway:

  1. Heath Promotion and Prevention
  2. Recognition and Identification
  3. Assessment, Diagnosis and Planning for the Future
  4. Living Well With Dementia
  5. Increasing Care (including End of Life Care)

Download Birmingham and Solihull Dementia_Strategy 2014-17.

Quick links:

Tell us what you think

We would like to hear your views about how you use the Dementia Roadmap to support people living with dementia.

Tell us about your local group

If you run a local group or service for people living with dementia and would like to see information about your group appear on the Birmingham Dementia Roadmap, please complete this simple form.

Topics

  • Preventing well This section provides details of groups and resources related to the prevention of dementia, ensuring that the risk of people developing…
  • Diagnosing well Diagnosing dementia is often difficult, particularly in the early stages. The GP is usually the first person who is  consulted either…
  • Supporting well When someone is diagnosed with dementia, they should be supported to remain as independent as possible, and to continue to enjoy their…
  • Living well Many people are happier if they can remain independent and in their own homes as long as possible. It is important for clinicians to…
  • Dying well When someone is diagnosed with dementia, they should be encouraged to remain as independent as possible, and to continue to enjoy their…
  • Caring well GPs and the primary care team can provide carers with invaluable support, advice and information. For example, they can provide information…
  • Underpinning This section contains details of groups and resources relevant to several topics that underpin the well pathway for dementia, such…

NHS Hospital Mistakes Blunders Father’s Brain Stored 22 Years After Death

NHS Mistakes Misconduct

A person’s brain being found in the wrong corpse by an undertaker was among incidents reported by mortuaries from 2014 to 2016, a BBC Freedom of Information request has found.

There were 278 serious incidents in total in the three-year timespan in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Accidental damage to bodies was reported 89 times over that period.

The Human Tissue Authority (HTA) said that when incidents occur, thorough investigations are undertaken.

Wrong bodies released

Organs were discovered by hospitals after the rest of a body had been released to a family on 13 occasions, while the wrong body was released to families 36 times.

University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust recorded the largest number of incidents – 11 – over the three-year period.

During post-mortems, a deceased person’s body is opened and the organs removed for examination.

The pathologist will return the organs to the body after the post-mortem has been completed, and tissue will generally only be retained where a death is suspicious.

The HTA defines a serious incident as “human errors or system failures that lead to damage to bodies or misplaced bodies or body parts”.


Reportable incidents

  • An undertaker discovered a brain in the abdominal cavity of a body which did not belong to it (Warwick Hospital)
  • Human error resulted in a mix-up of brains (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford)
  • Memory stick containing unencrypted images from two post-mortem examinations was left on public transport (Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust)
  • A large corpse could not be removed from a mortuary freezer because of the way it had frozen (King’s College Hospital, London)
  • Wrong body released and cremated (Southport & Formby District General Hospital)

Sarah Simpson
Image caption Sarah Simpson said her father’s brain was stored for 22 years after his death

Sarah Simpson found out that her father’s brain and other parts were stored against family wishes for 22 years after his death at South Tyneside District Hospital.

“In March earlier this year, police knocked on my door, saying it’s about my dad, Terry Simpson.” she said.

“I said it can’t be him as he has been dead for 22 years, and it must be about my brother, with the same name, who had died a few months earlier.”

The police explained that her father’s organs were at the hospital, and were about to be released, and talked to her about funeral options.

Terry SimpsonImage copyright SARAH SIMPSON
Image caption Terry Simpson was killed in a fall in 1995

“There had been no permission to take any body parts at any time. My dad believed in reincarnation.

“He used to say, you’re not taking my eyes or anything because I don’t know where I’m going afterwards’,” she explained.

She said she had not been given any answers about why it had happened, and the incident had sent her family into panic.

“I’ve just had to have another funeral for my dad,” she said.

South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust’s Medical Director Dr Shaz Wahid said: “We met with Ms Simpson in September 2017 to explain the conclusions of our internal review into the retention of forensic human tissue samples at South Tyneside District Hospital and the measures we have taken to prevent this from occurring again in the future.

“Once again, we apologise unreservedly to Ms Simpson and all the families involved for the undoubted distress this must have caused.”

Rare events

Chris Birkett, director of regulation for the HTA, said: “Incidents such as these are distressing for the families of those involved and, although they are rare, should never happen.

“If an incident does happen, we work with the establishment to ensure that a thorough investigation is undertaken, that lessons are learned, and that improvements are made to mitigate the risks of similar incidents happening again.”

He also said the number of incidents was small given the fact that 330,000 bodies enter the care of mortuaries in England and Wales annually.

Leicester’s Hospitals said it dealt with a large number of bodies, as one of the biggest and busiest mortuaries in the UK, and had an excellent culture of reporting.

Oxford University Hospitals said the very regrettable mix-up of brains was because of a labelling error at the John Radcliffe during a specialist examination as part of the autopsy process, and that an external expert had reviewed its processes in response.

Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust said it had reported the data breach to the Information Commissioners Office and HTA, and that its guidelines had not been followed.

Kings College Hospital said that new procedures had been introduced after the freezer incident to stop the same thing happening again and it had informed and apologised to the family.

University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust said a full investigation had been undertaken into the error at Warwick Hospital and it was rectified immediately.

Dementia: Inside The Human Brain Neuroanatomy Neurology Video

The Human Brain Autopsy

The brain tissue in a person with Alzheimer’s has progressively fewer nerve cells and connections, and the total brain size shrinks.

Dementia with Lewy bodies is a neurodegenerative condition linked to abnormal structures in the brain.

The brain changes involve a protein called alpha-synuclein.

At first, Alzheimer’s disease typically destroys neurons and their connections in parts of the brain involved in memory, including the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus.

It later affects areas in the cerebral cortex responsible for language, reasoning, and social behaviour.

Dementia isn’t a single disease.

Many of these diseases are associated with an abnormal build-up of proteins in the brain.

This build-up causes nerve cells to function less well and ultimately die.

As the nerve cells die, different areas of the brain shrink.

Dementia symptoms include:
  • Trouble holding urine (incontinence)
  • Increase in memory loss and forgetfulness.
  • Inability to use or find the right words and phrases.
  • Difficulty doing challenging mental maths exercises, such as counting backwards from 100 by 7.
  • Increase in social withdrawal.

One of the main topics of discussion when someone is diagnosed with dementia is the “stage” of the disease — a marker of how far it has progressed.

Dementia symptoms can range from mild memory loss to more severe cognitive difficulties that make it hard to manage daily activities without help.

These symptoms are broadly grouped into categories called stages that help guide doctors and families in their care of dementia patients.

“Usually we think of memory loss as a continuum,” explains Raj C. Shah, MD, medical director of the Rush Memory Center at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. “Dementia is defined as chronic memory loss, ultimately affecting quality of life.”