Lewy Body Dementia UK List Of Dementia Information Podcasts

Lewy Body Dementia UK

At Lewy Body Dementia UK we will always do our very best to bring you information that you (may) find helpful.

We search far and wide all over the internet world wide to bring you lots of information all in one place.

We will never stop trying to find material that may be of help to you.

Please be aware that because we search world wide then the material we bring you may not always be from your country of residence.

Below we bring you a whole list of podcasts we found here to listen to.

Dementia Untangled

27 DAYS AGOThis podcast explores unique topics related to dementia through conversations with physicians, experts, and community leaders—focusing on innovative ideas, practical strategies, and proven methods to create a supportive path for caregivers. Reach out to us with questions or comments at DementiaUntangled@bannerhealth.com.Dementia Resilience with Jill Lorentz

Dementia Resilience with Jill Lorentz

15 DAYS AGOTopics include Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Lewy Body and living with other Dementia’sDementia Researcher

Dementia Researcher

10 DAYS AGOPlease take a moment to vote for us in the Peoples Choice Podcast Awards – go to https://www.podcastawards.com, register an account, find Dementia Researcher in the Science & Medicine Category, and hit submit. In our biweekly podcast our regular hosts bring together panels of early career researchers and other dementia experts to discuss their research and career topics to support other early career researchers. Research investigating Alzheimer’s and other dementias, exploring prevention, di …Discovering Dementia

Discovering Dementia

8 WEEKS AGOHow one person’s dementia story led to a journey of discovery. A podcast with Penny Bell.Alzheimer’s Society Podcast

Alzheimer’s Society Podcast

15 DAYS AGOWe’re the UK’s leading dementia charity. We provide information and support, improve care, fund research, and create lasting change for people affected by dementiaDementia Care Partner Talk Show with Teepa Snow

Dementia Care Partner Talk Show with Teepa Snow

5 DAYS AGOThis is the Dementia Care Partner Talk Show, a podcast to help you navigate the senior care maze. Learn and laugh with us as we discuss creative solutions and ideas to common and uncommon dementia care challenges, and how to make sense of the senior care industry and options even if you’re not a professional. Are you caring for a person living with dementia? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note at info@teepasnow.com and tell us what you’d like for us to discuss! You can also visit …The FuMP

The FuMP

1 DAY AGOThe Funny Music Project!The Fun Zone

The Fun Zone

2 DAYS AGOThe Fun Zone is a show hosted by Byron Lee. 2 hours of comedy music, dementia, and anything weird!Manic Mondays

Manic Mondays

2 DAYS AGOWeekly comedy show featuring funny music, News Of The Stupid, and more!Konspirasi.ID

Konspirasi.ID

3 YEARS AGOThe truth is stranger than fictionThe Caregiver’s Toolbox

The Caregiver’s Toolbox

23 DAYS AGOProviding education and information on senior care topics.The Brain Health Revolution Podcast

The Brain Health Revolution Podcast

7 DAYS AGOJoin award-winning neurologists and researchers, Drs. Dean and Ayesha Sherzai, for a fun, innovative and inspirational approach to brain health and all matters concerning the remarkable human mind. This is the century of the brain, a time when our insights into this incredible organ are exploding at an unprecedented pace. Explore ways to take control of your own brain health, avoid chronic diseases that are devastating communities worldwide, and expand your mind’s capacity beyond anything yo …Realityarts

Realityarts

9 DAYS AGOArts and Creativity for health – Inspiring you to unlock your creative talents. Looking at how Creative expression can impact on our health and well-being and effect change in our lives. Posting Mondays – Creating in Faith – You are encouraged to dive deep into an inspired thought Wednesday – Arts and Wellness – Arts, interviews, strategies, resources for those living with Dementia and their Carers. Friday – Inspiration Shorts is a top-up reflection suggestion. Want to make a Donation to the …Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care

2 YEARS AGONew podcast weblogThis Dementia Life

This Dementia Life

1 YEAR AGOThis Dementia Life is a heartwarming podcast program about living life with dementia.Dementia Radio Podcast

Dementia Radio Podcast

11 YEARS AGOPodcast for Dementia RadioJourney Ahead

Journey Ahead

12 DAYS AGOJourney Ahead features upbeat conversations with area experts on how you or your aging loved ones can live life to the fullest in the Chippewa Valley. Hosted by Lisa Wells of the Aging & Disability Resource Center of Eau Claire County, enjoy discussions focused on enhancing the quality life while aging, living with dementia, keeping our aging loved ones active and healthy, changing attitudes on aging, and many more insightful topics. Subscribe for free to always get the latest monthly episode.Dementia Friends: Kingsbridge Dementia Friendly Community

Dementia Friends: Kingsbridge Dementia Friendly Community

2 YEARS AGOKingsbridge Dementia Friendly Community want the voices of those living with dementia in our community to be heard and valued; we aim to establish links with businesses and service providers to encourage all to improve services and increase awareness of dementia. Produced by iamthehow with music from Kai Engel.Life With Dementia

Life With Dementia

13 DAYS AGOLife With Dementia is an interview-style podcast sharing relevant research, personal stories, and practical tips for living well with dementia. We talk to people all over the world: scientists, researchers, practitioners, family care partners, industry professionals, and people living with dementia to hear firsthand about solutions they’ve discovered and what we can do to improve resources and support for people affected by dementia.Dementia Discussions

Dementia Discussions

8 DAYS AGOA weekly podcast about dementia. Join your host, Barbara Hament, as she interviews medical professionals, caregivers, and various experts on how to better understand and cope with this challenging and complex disease.Living With Hospice

Living With Hospice

21 DAYS AGOEveryone’s end of life journey should be comfortable, peaceful and dignified. In every episode, Mitch Ware, long time Hospice Bedside volunteer and former Hospice client, will share his experiences and knowledge to show others how they can achieve the best palliative care available through Hospice. And, he will take your questions and answer them on future episodes as well. If you are considering end of life care, this podcast is for you!Devo Spice’s The Insider Podcast – Public Feed

Devo Spice’s The Insider Podcast – Public Feed

15 DAYS AGODevo Spice has been described as the red-headed stepson of Weird Al Yankovic and Eminem, a fitting description since his comedy rap songs have topped the charts on the Dr. Demento Show, where Weird Al himself got his start. On The Insider Devo gives you a behind the scenes peek and what is going on in his demented world every month including some sneak peeks at new projects, and plans for the future.Let’s Talk About Care

Let’s Talk About Care

15 DAYS AGOThis podcast highlights issues related to social care. We find out the funny, heartwarming, shocking and inspiring stories about care and hear from policy makers, care professionals, celebrities and those giving and receiving care.Bridge the Gap: The Senior Living Podcast

Bridge the Gap: The Senior Living Podcast

2 DAYS AGOWelcome to Bridge the Gap with hosts Lucas McCurdy and Joshua Crisp. A podcast dedicated to informing, educating and influencing the future of housing and services for older adults in senior living.The Dementia Adventure

The Dementia Adventure

16 WEEKS AGOThe Dementia Adventure is for anyone whose life is being touched by dementia. Navigating the world of dementia and Alzheimer’s can feel overwhelming so this series is full of tips, advice, thoughts, support, love and shared experience. In each episode we meet experts of all kinds from research scientists, care workers, brain trainers, speech and language specialists, therapists and even a Buddhist monk. This podcast is the recipient of Alzheimer’s Research UK’s Inspire Fund and we are deligh …Dementia Dialogue

Dementia Dialogue

16 HOURS AGOCheck out http://www.dementiadialogue.ca Our podcasts feature people with dementia, their care/life partners, and supporters sharing experiences. They demonstrate their capacity to live fully and enable peer listeners to understand and gain insight and strengthen their adaptive skills. Episodes also enhance understanding within the broader community of what it means to live with dementia.Word of Mouth

Word of Mouth

22 HOURS AGOSeries exploring the world of words and the ways in which we use themMisUnderstanding Dementia Podcast

MisUnderstanding Dementia Podcast

44 WEEKS AGOAre you having a hard time taking care of your loved one that has Dementia? Do you feel stuck on how and what to do with your loved one that has Dementia? Are you ready to take care of yourself and your elderly loved one? Ready to be the best caregiver for your loved one? Then this podcast is for YOU!The Funny Music Podcast

The Funny Music Podcast

6 DAYS AGODevo Spice, The Great Luke Ski, and some rotating guest hosts discuss the most recent comedy songs posted on The FuMP.Let’s Talk Dementia

Let’s Talk Dementia

6 DAYS AGOThis podcast is designed to give you quick and entertaining information regarding caring for someone with dementia. “Carosene – The Gigolo Song (cdk Remix)” by Analog By Nature. 2015 Licensed under Creative Commons. Attribution Noncommercial (3.0). Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lets-talk-dementia/supportRTÉ – Lets Talk Dementia

RTÉ – Lets Talk Dementia

3 YEARS AGOThis 6 part series series looks at every aspect of dementia, from diagnosis, to carers, to end of life care.Boomer Living Senior Living Broadcast

Boomer Living Senior Living Broadcast

4 DAYS AGOBoomer Living Senior Living Broadcast is inspired by the professionals caring for older adults, hosted by Hanh Brown. Every week we have industry professionals on the show, namely neurologists, gerontologists, geriatricians, technologists, caregivers, providers, developers, and operators. They share their journey, impact, and lessons learned in caring for the aging population. Join the conversation of hot topics in serving older adults with friends and industry experts. The future of aging w …What The Dementia

What The Dementia

21 DAYS AGOOn What the Dementia we will discuss important issues that you may run into as care partner, challenging dementia behaviors you may encounter, we will demystify certain dementia care topics, and learn to question certain practices that may be better approached a different way. Our biggest goal is to integrate dementia care talks into everyday conversations. Dementia definitely sucks, but we need to talk about it! If you think that Bambu Care and our What the Dementia podcast can help you alo …Alzheimer’s Talks

Alzheimer’s Talks

5 WEEKS AGOAlzheimer’s Talks is a free series from UsAgainstAlzheimer’s. We interview leaders in Alzheimer’s research, treatment, prevention, brain health, disparities, patient-focused drug development, books, caregiving and other topics on progress against this disease. You can sign-up for the live discussions, which feature your questions, at http://www.usagainstalzheimers.org.Adventure before Dementia: Outback Adventure Show

Adventure before Dementia: Outback Adventure Show

2 YEARS AGO‘Adventure Before Dementia’ is a radio show for camping enthusiasts. Whether you like staying in caravan parks or bush camping, be it up the river, along the coast, discovering unsealed national parks or more remote outback explorations, ‘Adventure Before Dementia’ is your weekly dose of escapism. Hosts Anita & Mike Pavey have worked as photo-journalists for some of Australia’s most popular 4×4, camper trailer and caravan publications. They have travelled widely including a 13-month Big Lap …Dementia Matters

Dementia Matters

8 DAYS AGOBrought to you by the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Dementia Matters is a podcast dedicated to discussing the latest in Alzheimer’s disease research and caregiving resources. Our host, Dr. Nathaniel Chin speaks with a range of research and caregiving experts to keep you informed on current research studies, headlines and caregiving strategies. Find show notes and more resources at adrc.wisc.edu/dementia-matters.All in the Mind

All in the Mind

15 DAYS AGOProgramme exploring the limits and potential of the human mindShaping Dementia Environments

Shaping Dementia Environments

15 DAYS AGOThe experience of living in dementia care environments hasn’t evolved in 30 years – and we think it’s time for change. Conversations with disruptive operators, policy shapers, and designers examine how new thinking is shaping the places people living with dementia call home. Each episode, we’ll elaborate on a single pattern of innovation in dementia environments – some focusing on physical spaces, others highlighting care philosophies and procedures. Join Max Winters and Jennifer Sodo, senio …BrainShape Podcast

BrainShape Podcast

1 DAY AGOHost Dr. Andrea Wilkinson has a PhD in Psychology, with a specialization in Cognitive Aging. She has been studying brain fitness and cognitive maintenance for over 15 years. The BrainShape Podcast discusses the hottest issues, topics, interests and concerns related to healthy aging and brain health for aging adults, older adults, seniors and baby boomers who want to learn about how to stay mentally and physically engaged for as long as possible. What are the tips and techniques that promote …Virtual Alzheimers

Virtual Alzheimers

2 YEARS AGOCognitive psychology is a branch of psychology that investigates internal mental processes such as problem solving, memory, and language.Innovative Dementia Care

Innovative Dementia Care

1 YEAR AGOIf you are living with someone who has Alzheimer’s, dementia, confusion or memory loss, you know just how difficult the simple act of communication can be between you and your loved one. Susan Kohler, author of How to Communicate with Alzheimer’s, is host of Innovative Dementia Care, a program designed to help you, the caregiver learn about the communication process, why it is so important in caregiving, the problems in communication, and useful techniques to facilitate communication that wi …Inaudible

Inaudible

19 HOURS AGOThe podcast that’s impossible to categorise, describe, taste or indeed listen to.GeriPal

GeriPal

6 DAYS AGOA geriatrics and palliative care podcast for every health care professional. We invite the brightest minds in geriatrics, hospice, and palliative care to talk about the topics that you care most about, ranging from recently published research in the field to controversies that keep us up at night. You’ll laugh, learn and maybe sing along. Hosted by Eric Widera and Alex Smith.Alzheimer’s Disease (Audio)

Alzheimer’s Disease (Audio)

19 WEEKS AGODon’t miss these vital updates on the latest in Alzheimer’s and dementia care and research from the University of California.AUUF Podcasts

AUUF Podcasts

3 DAYS AGOThe BMJ Podcast

The BMJ Podcast

6 DAYS AGOThe BMJ is an international peer reviewed medical journal and a fully “online first” publication. The BMJ’s vision is to be the world’s most influential and widely read medical journal. Our mission is to lead the debate on health and to engage, inform, and stimulate doctors, researchers, and other health professionals in ways that will improve outcomes for patients. We aim to help doctors to make better decisions.Konspirasi.ID

Konspirasi.ID

3 YEARS AGOThe truth is stranger than fictionThe Rugby Pod

The Rugby Pod

1 DAY AGOThe Rugby Pod with Andy Goode, Big Jim Hamilton & hosted by Andy Rowe is the most listened to Rugby podcast in the world. We cover all the latest news, rumours insight and stories, but with plenty of humour, opinions and the best guests from the game, including current and former internationals. Follow us on social media and send us in your questions to chat through each week.Neurology Minute

Neurology Minute

5 HOURS AGOThe Neurology Minute podcast delivers a brief daily summary of what you need to know in the field of neurology, the latest science focused on the brain, and timely topics explored by leading neurologists and neuroscientists. From the American Academy of Neurology and hosted by Stacey Clardy, MD, PhD, FAAN, with contributions by experts from the Neurology journals, Neurology Today, Continuum, and more.Life is a Sacred Journey

Life is a Sacred Journey

5 DAYS AGOCelebrating the contribution, role, and impact of elders and caregivers in our community and beyond.Ask A Professional

Ask A Professional

6 YEARS AGODealing with aging parents? You need answers. Our professionals can help! Our Experts include: Elder Law Attorney Nurses, Certified Senior Advisor,Geriatric Care Managers and Dementia Care Specialists.The Caregiver’s Toolbox

The Caregiver’s Toolbox

23 DAYS AGOProviding education and information on senior care topics.AlzRightNow

AlzRightNow

3 YEARS AGOThe intention of this podcast is to take the fear and stigma out of Alzheimer’s and related Dementia.My belief is if I can survive this terrible disease as a primary CareGiver so can you and I will show you how! We will have experts, experiences, and teachings to give a solid base in the understanding. I have been where you are and I know and empathize with the struggle to remain positive in what is usually a dark situation. We will talk about silver linings, living in the moment, looking to …The Experts Speak – An Educational Service of the Florida Psychiatric Society

The Experts Speak – An Educational Service of the Florida Psychiatric Society

29 DAYS AGOListen to 15-20 minute long interviews of experts on various topics related to mental and general health. The topics will be continuously expanded. The interviews are designed for both professionals and non-professionals. Topics range from climate change issues and the basis of new medication research, the effect of media on girls’s self-images, discussions of violence, same-sex marriages, pollution, bullying, divorce, OCD, addictions, borderline personality disorders, mental health issues i …Lust for Life

Lust for Life

8 WEEKS AGOLust for Life is a sex-positive, age-positive podcast all about sexuality and intimacy in later life. Each week we’ll be speaking with special guests and experts to open up the conversation around sexuality after 60, tackling taboos and shaking off the stereotypes to talk about what really matters. We’ll be discussing everything from changing bodies, relationships, dating, desire and libido through to ageism, sexual rights, dementia and social care, plus many other topics. For more informati …Brain Song Radio

Brain Song Radio

4 YEARS AGOBetter Brain, Better You

Better Brain, Better You

2 DAYS AGOJoin neuroscientist, Dr Ben Webb, and clinical psychologist, Dr Zoe Webb, to cultivate a healthy brain for a mentally healthy and happy life. New episodes every Monday for brains of all ages.Money Box

Money Box

4 DAYS AGOThe latest news from the world of personal finance plus advice for those trying to make the most of their money.Voice Aerobics Talking 2 You

Voice Aerobics Talking 2 You

5 YEARS AGOVoice Aerobics is hosted by Mary Spremulli, a speech-language pathologist and blogger. Mary and guests will talk about issues affecting people living with Parkinsons and other neurogenic conditions. Learn more and live well.Mega shake

Mega shake

17 DAYS AGOGirls in their 30s speaking their minds on life and entertainment.An AARP Take On Today

An AARP Take On Today

12 DAYS AGOAn AARP Take On Today is news you can use about health, work, money, aging, entertainment and more.Memory Gone Wild

Memory Gone Wild

7 YEARS AGOMemory Gone Wild is an entertaining fun Podcast audio quiz program using a live radio style format that sharpens your listening skills and helps build your retention and recall capabilities. This is accomplished by the shows host Kenneth Campbell playing audio snippets from Best Selling Audiobooks and challenges you the listener, in a fun and entertaining way to respond to questions from what you just heard.All Home Care Matters

All Home Care Matters

3 DAYS AGOAll Home Care Matters is an informative podcast and YouTube show that helps viewers and listeners learn about resources, tips, & discussion on all things home care.Realityarts

Realityarts

9 DAYS AGOArts and Creativity for health – Inspiring you to unlock your creative talents. Looking at how Creative expression can impact on our health and well-being and effect change in our lives. Posting Mondays – Creating in Faith – You are encouraged to dive deep into an inspired thought Wednesday – Arts and Wellness – Arts, interviews, strategies, resources for those living with Dementia and their Carers. Friday – Inspiration Shorts is a top-up reflection suggestion. Want to make a Donation to the …Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care

2 YEARS AGONew podcast weblogKimberly D. Scott (That Kimberly)

Kimberly D. Scott (That Kimberly)

1 YEAR AGOHello, thank you for listening. My name is Kimberly D. Scott, the woman with 2 first names. I host 2 podcasts: Industry Celebrities podcast, I interview industry professionals (in any industry) & ask them questions about their industry plus guests share a little advice to their younger self. 2nd podcast, Caregivers Stories, highlighting those who care for their loved ones with Dementia and educate all on Dementia diseases. If you are interested in being on either podcast (@ no charge), pleas …photomoments

photomoments

24 WEEKS AGOJerome Whittingham is a photographer, writer, and podcaster. He reports on community development and social issues. Topics of interest include the arts, health and wellbeing, housing and homelessness, children and young people, dementia, addiction, local food and food sustainability, heritage, conservation and the environment. Jerome returned to Stoke-on-Trent in Spring 2021, having previously lived and worked in Hull for over 25 years. Follow him on twitter: @photomomentsCaring for Parents Together

Caring for Parents Together

7 YEARS AGOThis show strives to educate family caregivers on who can help them, where to find resources, issues of aging and how to navigate the complex senior environment. Interviews are conducted with professionals in the field of aging and with caregivers talking about their challenges.OMG I’m Getting Older and So Is My Mom

OMG I’m Getting Older and So Is My Mom

22 DAYS AGOOMG I’m Getting Older and so is My Mom is about coping with getting older ourselves and dealing with our aging parents.This Dementia Life

This Dementia Life

1 YEAR AGOThis Dementia Life is a heartwarming podcast program about living life with dementia.Train Your Brain Podcast with Dr. Michael Trayford

Train Your Brain Podcast with Dr. Michael Trayford

30 WEEKS AGOHow to train your brain 365 days a year for a sharper mind.Dementia Radio Podcast

Dementia Radio Podcast

11 YEARS AGOPodcast for Dementia RadioTalk Evidence

Talk Evidence

24 DAYS AGONoneWe Buy Houses With Brian Spitz

We Buy Houses With Brian Spitz

7 YEARS AGOJoin host Brian Spitz, founder of Big State Home Buyers Houston, as he discusses seamless real estate and interviews related professionals for Houston real estate investors and home sellers. We buy Houston houses fast!JAMA Neurology Author Interviews

JAMA Neurology Author Interviews

16 DAYS AGOInterviews with authors of articles from JAMA Neurology. JAMA Neurology is an international peer-reviewed journal for physicians caring for people with neurologic disorders and those interested in the structure and function of the normal and diseased nervous system.Frontlines of Caregiving

Frontlines of Caregiving

3 YEARS AGOLet’s face it, being the family caregiver is not easy and not for sissies. So many emotional landmines – missing the loved one you used to know, being pulled in so many directions, so many needs – so little time, what about me??? This podcast is a place for us to come together and share our stories, our challenges and our small victories. It’s also a place where we can learn from experts about how to make our lives manageable with down to earth tips and resources. It’s time to be honest abou …The Doctorpreneurs

The Doctorpreneurs

23 DAYS AGOA podcast on health, aging & entrepreneurship.Rugby Union Weekly

Rugby Union Weekly

7 HOURS AGOUgo Monye, Chris Jones and Danny Care dissect the biggest rugby union stories of the weekDementia Friends: Kingsbridge Dementia Friendly Community

Dementia Friends: Kingsbridge Dementia Friendly Community

2 YEARS AGOKingsbridge Dementia Friendly Community want the voices of those living with dementia in our community to be heard and valued; we aim to establish links with businesses and service providers to encourage all to improve services and increase awareness of dementia. Produced by iamthehow with music from Kai Engel.CrossTalk

CrossTalk

2 YEARS AGOSoul music (often referred to simply as soul) is a popular music genre that originated in the African American community in the United States in the 1950s and early 1960s. It combines elements of African-American gospel music, rhythm and blues and jazz..Researchers are looking to the salience network of the brain to develop music-based treatments to help alleviate anxiety in patients with dementia.The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

2 DAYS AGOExpert insight on health, performance, longevity, critical thinking, and pursuing excellence. Dr. Peter Attia (Stanford/Hopkins/NIH-trained MD) talks with leaders in their fields.Ghouls Next Door

Ghouls Next Door

8 DAYS AGOA media-analysis podcast from a horror lens, exploring the unique and raw way society and culture influence film and media. We review media and discuss the history and psychology behind our fears. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-ghouls-next-door/supportHope Through Knowledge with Zoë A. Lewis, M.D., Talk Radio For Caregivers

Hope Through Knowledge with Zoë A. Lewis, M.D., Talk Radio For Caregivers

9 YEARS AGOHope Through Knowledge with Zoë A. Lewis, M.D., is Talk Radio For Caregivers. This dynamic thirty minute talk show brings the experts on care giving right to you. Dr. Zoe Lewis interviews the top authors and experts from around the country. Guests are recognized for their contributions to care giving, aging, eldercare, and alternative wellness strategies that you can’t afford to miss. 65 million Americans are caregivers and with more than 16 years of hospital-based medicine, a private practi …Devo Spice’s The Insider Podcast – Public Feed

Devo Spice’s The Insider Podcast – Public Feed

15 DAYS AGODevo Spice has been described as the red-headed stepson of Weird Al Yankovic and Eminem, a fitting description since his comedy rap songs have topped the charts on the Dr. Demento Show, where Weird Al himself got his start. On The Insider Devo gives you a behind the scenes peek and what is going on in his demented world every month including some sneak peeks at new projects, and plans for the future.Bridge the Gap: The Senior Living Podcast

Bridge the Gap: The Senior Living Podcast

2 DAYS AGOWelcome to Bridge the Gap with hosts Lucas McCurdy and Joshua Crisp. A podcast dedicated to informing, educating and influencing the future of housing and services for older adults in senior living.Super Aging with Fatou Ceesay

Super Aging with Fatou Ceesay

15 DAYS AGOSuper Aging podcast: Exploring Healthy Aging, Amplifying Caregiver Voices and Raising Alzheimer’s Awareness. This podcast strives to organically give voice to caregivers, raise awareness about aging issues including dementia, and promote healthy aging. Interviews are conducted with experts in the health and aging industry and caregivers to help educate our community about healthy lifestyles, aging issues, and caregiver experiences and strategies.Caregiving For Dementia

Caregiving For Dementia

1 YEAR AGOThe show is about the Delaney Family’s caregiving for someone with dementia. My mother has had dementia for four years now, In the show, we talk about things we do and don’t do because of dementia. I ‘m hoping that this podcast will help someone Who’s in the same situation. So basically the show is a little bit about things to do and things not to do with someone with dementia.DJV Health Show

DJV Health Show

22 DAYS AGODoug Stephan, along with Dr. Ken Kronhaus and Dr. Jack Stockwell, review the latest peer-reviewed and alternative health news and take listener calls.Compass & Clock Info-Tainment Podcast

Compass & Clock Info-Tainment Podcast

6 DAYS AGOWelcome to the Compass & Clock’s Info-Tianment PodcastThrough our podcasts we’ll explore how to live your best life now and well into retirement.We’ll discuss topics in financial planning, housing, and insurance.We’ll talk wellness, relationships, and leisure pursuits. A full active life requires planning for your goals and preparing for the unexpected.We’ll introduce you to a variety of entertaining guests, from knowledgeable experts, to folks sharing stories of their life experiences, and …Divided by Werewolves

Divided by Werewolves

2 DAYS AGOThe official podcast of the Divided by Werewolves show!NPS MedicineWise Podcasts

NPS MedicineWise Podcasts

12 DAYS AGOIndependent, not-for-profit and evidence-based, NPS MedicineWise provides practical tools and information about medicines, health conditions and medical tests to help individuals and health professionals make better health decisions.The Dementia Adventure

The Dementia Adventure

16 WEEKS AGOThe Dementia Adventure is for anyone whose life is being touched by dementia. Navigating the world of dementia and Alzheimer’s can feel overwhelming so this series is full of tips, advice, thoughts, support, love and shared experience. In each episode we meet experts of all kinds from research scientists, care workers, brain trainers, speech and language specialists, therapists and even a Buddhist monk. This podcast is the recipient of Alzheimer’s Research UK’s Inspire Fund and we are deligh …MisUnderstanding Dementia Podcast

MisUnderstanding Dementia Podcast

44 WEEKS AGOAre you having a hard time taking care of your loved one that has Dementia? Do you feel stuck on how and what to do with your loved one that has Dementia? Are you ready to take care of yourself and your elderly loved one? Ready to be the best caregiver for your loved one? Then this podcast is for YOU!The Healthy Brain Podcast

The Healthy Brain Podcast

32 WEEKS AGOThe Healthy Brain Podcast is a fun and encouraging place to connect for Real Talk about healthy living, so that you can have the healthiest brain ever for physical stability, mental clarity, and longevity. There’s no sugar-coating here! Certified nutritionist and a daughter of dementia, Carrie Miller hits on hard topics and covers the facts giving you insight into alternative approaches to optimize your brain. It’s time to Take Control of Your Own Health, so that you can enjoy a life full of …Slack Jaw Punks

Slack Jaw Punks

11 DAYS AGOGet Your Geek On! Slackjawpunks.comFocus on the Family Australia

Focus on the Family Australia

2 DAYS AGOFocus on the Family radio programs are played on over 550 stations around Australia with an estimated 4.5 million listeners each month. While the content is diverse the purpose and hope for each program is the same – to help your family thrive.Here & Now

Here & Now

19 HOURS AGONPR and WBUR’s live midday news programPrevention Works

Prevention Works

6 DAYS AGOPrevention Works is a series of conversations with some of our nation’s top public health researchers. Join host Gretchen Miller as she brings together policy makers and researchers to discuss how the Prevention Centre is finding new ways of addressing Australia’s greatest health challenge: lifestyle-related chronic disease.95bFM: The Wire

95bFM: The Wire

1 DAY AGOListen back to features and interviews from 95bFM’s daily news & current affairs show, The Wire. Your hosts Felix Walton, Jemima Huston, James Tapp, Justin Wong and Ayana Piper-Healion focus on the issues of Tāmaki Makaurau and elsewhere, in independent-thinking bFM style. Weekdays 12-1pm on 95bFM.Purple Pen Podcast

Purple Pen Podcast

7 DAYS AGOEducation and news for pharmacists, with a focus on Australian clinical pharmacy practice. Hosted by Jane, Kristin and Dan, we provide CPD and news for pharmacists, especially those interested in Australian clinical practice.Boomer Living Senior Living Broadcast

Boomer Living Senior Living Broadcast

4 DAYS AGOBoomer Living Senior Living Broadcast is inspired by the professionals caring for older adults, hosted by Hanh Brown. Every week we have industry professionals on the show, namely neurologists, gerontologists, geriatricians, technologists, caregivers, providers, developers, and operators. They share their journey, impact, and lessons learned in caring for the aging population. Join the conversation of hot topics in serving older adults with friends and industry experts. The future of aging w …All in the Mind

All in the Mind

15 DAYS AGOProgramme exploring the limits and potential of the human mindDrive With Tom Elliott

Drive With Tom Elliott

5 HOURS AGO3AW Drive with Tom Elliott, keeping you informed and entertained on your way home 3-6pm, weekdays.Perspectives

Perspectives

13 DAYS AGOJoin WFSU Public Media and host Tom Flanigan for the live, listener call-in program Perspectives. It’s the perfect forum to discuss the issues that concern listeners in the North Florida and South Georgia regions. Tom invites local guests for a one-hour discussion about timely social topics while encouraging listener comments and questions. WFSU relies on listener contributions to make this program an interactive platform for community discussion. There are several ways to get in touch with …The Alzheimer’s Podcast

The Alzheimer’s Podcast

12 WEEKS AGOThe Alzheimer’s Podcast with Mike Good of Together in This is your #1 resource for practical tips and insights; empowering you and your family to live well with Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia.AlzheimersQ

AlzheimersQ

2 YEARS AGOAlzheimer’s disease instructs us as to the true nature of human dignityKnowledge For Caregivers

Knowledge For Caregivers

7 HOURS AGOThe Knowledge for Caregivers Podcast will provide practical tips from a geriatric nurse’s perspective on how to help your aged love one. The world is experiencing an explosion of people living longer. At some point though, an aged person begins to need help. Most of that help is provided by family members. Family members usually begin a steep learning curve on how to help their aged loved ones. Every week I will provide practical tips that I use with my own family to help you navigate the ca …Beyond the Script

Beyond the Script

22 DAYS AGODive into conversations with clinical pharmacists from the University of Otago School of Pharmacy Clinic, He Rau Kawakawa Whare Haumanu, as they share insights into the free clinical consultations that help patients review and manage their medicinesFood is Medicine with Patrick Holford

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7 YEARS AGOPatrick Holford is a pioneer in new approaches to health and nutrition and is widely regarded as Britain’s best-selling author and leading spokesman on nutrition and mental health issues. With new discoveries about the links between nutrition and health coming to light every day, and newspapers reporting often conflicting information, these pod casts aim to give you reliable information on what to eat and supplement to help improve your health and prevent some of the most common diseases tod …Neurology Minute

Neurology Minute

5 HOURS AGOThe Neurology Minute podcast delivers a brief daily summary of what you need to know in the field of neurology, the latest science focused on the brain, and timely topics explored by leading neurologists and neuroscientists. From the American Academy of Neurology and hosted by Stacey Clardy, MD, PhD, FAAN, with contributions by experts from the Neurology journals, Neurology Today, Continuum, and more.Prepare to Care

Prepare to Care

2 DAYS AGOA podcast dedicate to the thousands of unpaid caregivers in Houston and the loved ones they care for. Find out more at http://www.aarp.org/HoustonPTC and help us to provide better Caregiving resources by filling out this survey: https://aarp.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6EkgZ8A8REjFuRfAlzheimer’s Talks

Alzheimer’s Talks

5 WEEKS AGOAlzheimer’s Talks is a free series from UsAgainstAlzheimer’s. We interview leaders in Alzheimer’s research, treatment, prevention, brain health, disparities, patient-focused drug development, books, caregiving and other topics on progress against this disease. You can sign-up for the live discussions, which feature your questions, at http://www.usagainstalzheimers.org.Awkward Story: A Dementia Podcast

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33 WEEKS AGOAwkward Story is a Dementia Education Podcast focused on supporting individuals touched by dementia related diagnoses. We wish to address the stigma and isolation often beset upon patients and their families by bringing their poignant, tragic, beautiful, awkward stories into the open. We will speak to insightful professionals that regularly assist individuals in their fight against dementia. We will also share our own insight as Clinical Social Workers specializing in dementia care. Most of …Peace with Dementia Podcast

Peace with Dementia Podcast

24 WEEKS AGOPeace with Dementia is a podcast for persons living with dementia and their care partners, focusing on practical tips and exploring current research. Matt encourages listeners to share what they hear on the show with their medical team and collaborate on care strategies. Together, we can create “Peace with Dementia.”Healing Ties

Healing Ties

1 DAY AGOBeyond Caregiving…How do care; we also have to care for ourselves. How do we treat friends, family, strangers we meet? How do we heal the physical, social, financial, spiritual aspect of life? How do we heal after caregiver ends/ We do this by creating Healing Ties! By sharing their caregiving stories with host Christopher MacLellan, our guests reveal how they are creating Healing Ties in their community by their words, actions, and deeds.YOUR BACKUP PLAN APP puts your life in 1-place in preparation of any unpredictable circumstance

YOUR BACKUP PLAN APP puts your life in 1-place in preparation of any unpredictable circumstance

8 DAYS AGOProfessional App Developer, and Financial Expert, Best-selling Author, Tina Ginn share’s everything she’s learnt about Emergency preparedness. If you’re interested in starting your own Backup Plan, or emergency plan this is the show for you! Get answers to all your questions about getting all of your critical life’s details organized into 1 easy simple way. Find out how to organize your details in case of any medical emergency, sudden death, or unexpected tragedy and avoid all that tremendou …The Curbsiders Internal Medicine Podcast

The Curbsiders Internal Medicine Podcast

2 DAYS AGOSupercharge your learning and enhance your practice with this Internal Medicine Podcast featuring board certified Internists as they interview the experts to bring you clinical pearls, practice changing knowledge and bad puns. Doctors Matthew Watto, Stuart Brigham, Paul Williams and friends (a national network of students, residents and clinician educators) deliver a little knowledge food for your brain hole. Yummy! No boring lectures here, just high value content and a healthy dose of humor …BrainShape Podcast

BrainShape Podcast

1 DAY AGOHost Dr. Andrea Wilkinson has a PhD in Psychology, with a specialization in Cognitive Aging. She has been studying brain fitness and cognitive maintenance for over 15 years. The BrainShape Podcast discusses the hottest issues, topics, interests and concerns related to healthy aging and brain health for aging adults, older adults, seniors and baby boomers who want to learn about how to stay mentally and physically engaged for as long as possible. What are the tips and techniques that promote …Empowering You Organically – Audio Edition

Empowering You Organically – Audio Edition

17 HOURS AGOAt Organixx our mission is simple: “Supporting you in being the healthiest YOU possible.” Subscribe to hear cutting edge natural health topics. Let natural health leaders share their knowledge and empower you to live a healthier life. We’re dedicated to supporting you because we’ve all experienced pain, suffering, and the struggle of our own bodies, or a loved one not being the healthiest they can be.Dr. Douglas Stockel Health and Wellness Weekly News Update

Dr. Douglas Stockel Health and Wellness Weekly News Update

1 DAY AGOCourtesy of Dr. Douglas StockelVertical Hold: Behind The Tech News

Vertical Hold: Behind The Tech News

6 DAYS AGOWelcome to Vertical Hold: Behind The Tech News, where podcast hosts @alexkidman and @adam_turner speak to Australia’s leading technology journalists every Friday to get the stories behind the tech news of the week.ACE – Aged Care Enrichment

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2 DAYS AGOEach week we bring aged care industry experts, thought leaders and passionate individuals directly to you to share their knowledge, stories and experiences. Hosted by Ash De Neef, the ACE Podcast is brought to you by SilVR Adventures ~ enriching the quality of life for seniors with meaningful activities that bring joy through virtual reality. Maybe you’d like to partner with us? Have your message, showcased directly to our rapidly growing audience of aged care executives and people working w …The Back to Health Chiropractic Podcast

The Back to Health Chiropractic Podcast

2 DAYS AGOYour source for tips and strategies to improve the health and wellness of you and your familyThe BMJ Podcast

The BMJ Podcast

6 DAYS AGOThe BMJ is an international peer reviewed medical journal and a fully “online first” publication. The BMJ’s vision is to be the world’s most influential and widely read medical journal. Our mission is to lead the debate on health and to engage, inform, and stimulate doctors, researchers, and other health professionals in ways that will improve outcomes for patients. We aim to help doctors to make better decisions.Natalie Spence’s Podcast

Natalie Spence’s Podcast

9 YEARS AGOJAMA Internal Medicine Author Interviews

JAMA Internal Medicine Author Interviews

23 DAYS AGOInterviews with authors of articles from JAMA Internal Medicine. JAMA Internal Medicine is an international peer-reviewed journal providing innovative and clinically relevant research for practitioners in general internal medicine and internal medicine subspecialties. We strive to publish articles that are stimulating to read, educate and inform readers with the most up-to-date research, and lead to positive change in our health care systems and the way we deliver patient care.NeuroNoodle Neurofeedback and Neuropsychology

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6 DAYS AGOFeaturing CoHosts: Neuropsychologists Dr. Laura Jansons, Dr. Skip Hrin, and QEEG Legend Jay Gunkelman. NeuroNoodle combines talk therapy with technology to improve the quality of your life. We discuss symptoms such as ADHD, Anxiety, and Depression and the different ways they can be addressed via Neurofeedback, Brain Maps,QEEG, and Talk Therapy Want to come on the show? Have a topic? Pete@neuronoodle.com Sign up to our Newsletter https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/moOsZyB/NeuroNoodleSecond Half of Life Podcast

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2 DAYS AGOThis podcast explores the many issues and topics related to elder law – the wide range of legal matters affecting people in their second half of life and individuals with disabilities. Produced by Steinbacher, Goodall and Yurchak: Your elder care and special needs law firm, providing quality representation in litigation, with locations in Williamsport and State College, Pa. Visit our website at PAElderCounsel.com.Innovative Dementia Care

Innovative Dementia Care

1 YEAR AGOIf you are living with someone who has Alzheimer’s, dementia, confusion or memory loss, you know just how difficult the simple act of communication can be between you and your loved one. Susan Kohler, author of How to Communicate with Alzheimer’s, is host of Innovative Dementia Care, a program designed to help you, the caregiver learn about the communication process, why it is so important in caregiving, the problems in communication, and useful techniques to facilitate communication that wi …Dr. Bond’s Life Changing Wellness

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12 DAYS AGODr. Bond’s Life Changing Wellness is an exciting and inspiring radio program that takes listeners into the world of nutrition, natural medicine and inspiring and uplifting stories to power your day ahead. Ward Bond, Ph.D. interviews exciting guests and experts from all areas of health, nutrition, music, film and television. With an incredible guest list this program is one you don’t want to miss. Subscribe today!Virtual Alzheimers

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2 YEARS AGOCognitive psychology is a branch of psychology that investigates internal mental processes such as problem solving, memory, and language.AUUF Podcasts

AUUF Podcasts

3 DAYS AGOLuke & Carrie’s Bad Rapport

Luke & Carrie’s Bad Rapport

7 WEEKS AGO35 listeners can’t be wrong.Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care

2 YEARS AGOTim Tholen, CEO of Thoughtful Health Care, discusses valuable strategies, tips, and information used every day in the care of Alzheimer and dementia patients at home. Thoughtful Healthcare is committed to providing your loved ones with the very best in personable, caring and friendly at home care. By providing compassionate and professional caregivers a higher quality of life for loved ones under our watch is achieved through advocacy, integrity, continuous improvement and, above all else, h …Cantonese and Mandarin for medical matters and much more

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23 DAYS AGOLearn the Cantonese and Mandarin ways to say things related to health and medical matters, and a hodgepodge of many other things you won’t learn in a formal classroom.Care Giver Life with Dignity Podcast

Care Giver Life with Dignity Podcast

27 DAYS AGOSue Salach-Cutler and Fran Piekarski co-host this podcast on the challenges caregivers face when helping their loved ones. Each episode is committed in ensuring that our listeners, and those they care for, live a life with dignity, no matter their mental or physical state. We advocate for our listeners in a system that grows more complicated each year. https://habaneromedia.net/Christ For The City Podcast

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3 DAYS AGOThe Christ for the City Podcast is a ministry of The Burning Bush Tabernacle Church. We are located at 2955 W. Belmont Avenue, Chicago, Illinois in the heart of the Avondale area. We are a Christ-centered, Bible believing church that seeks to minister the love of Christ according to the truth of God’s Word to the heart of the city through leading and power of the Holy Spirit. Visit us at: http://www.bbtab.orgThe Financial Advocate

The Financial Advocate

48 WEEKS AGOWelcome to the Financial Advocate Podcast – Formerly known as “The Special Needs Connection” & “Caring For Aging Parents.” We found ourselves sharing podcasts to both shows so we decided to combine them into one podcast! You will continue to find strategies, resources and connections for dealing with the emotional, physical, and financial challenges of aging parents and raising children with special needs. Hosted by Colin Meeks, a Certified Financial Planner focusing on Eldercare Financial P …Empower Women Pod – The Encore

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5 WEEKS AGOThe goal of this monthly series is for women to come to a welcoming setting where they hear about relevant topics and ask the questions they have never asked. Take charge of your financial life. Be empowered. No question is a bad question and we’ll answer in the simplest way we can. No jargon, we promise.Down to a sunless sea: memories of my dad

Down to a sunless sea: memories of my dad

51 WEEKS AGOThis podcast is about my dad, and me, and our relationship. It’s also about death, old age, care, love, history, change, mental health, science, medicine, art, dementia and friendship. It brings together memoir, clips from over 10 years of recordings of my father, sound design, and interviews with experts. It takes you on a journey down to a sunless sea. This podcast includes content funded by the British Podcast Awards Fund and the Wellcome Trust.Cleveland Clinic Health Essentials Podcast

Cleveland Clinic Health Essentials Podcast

1 HOUR AGOTune in for practical health advice from Cleveland Clinic experts. What’s really the healthiest diet for you? How can you safely recover after a heart attack? Can you boost your immune system? Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit, multispecialty academic medical center and is ranked as one of the nation’s top hospitals by U.S. News & World Report. Our experts offer trusted advice on health, wellness and nutrition for the whole family. Our podcasts are for informational purposes only and should no …Let’s chat health

Let’s chat health

22 DAYS AGOOn this podcast I’m going to explore our personal story about our experiences of navigating the healthcare system when Dad had a life-changing stroke. This is a daily and shocking experience shared by hundreds of families. I’m going to talk about why families need be involved in their relatives’ healthcare, and to encourage them to ask questions, and to be informed. By rebalancing the power dynamic between the healthcare team, the patient and family I want to discuss how we can give patients …Dhru Purohit Podcast

Dhru Purohit Podcast

2 DAYS AGOExploring the inner workings of the brain and the body with the brightest minds in wellness, medicine, and mindset. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.Navigating Dementia Therapy

Navigating Dementia Therapy

48 WEEKS AGOFuel your therapy and make the most of your sessions. For occupational, physical, and speech therapists. Build on the framework of your existing skills. Generate Ideas and Creative Solutions. Enjoy what you’re doing and have fun. Think Outside the Box! Peggy Watson MS, CCC-SLP is a specialist in non-pharmacological interventions for dementia. She is the founder of Consultants in Dementia Therapy and has presented for conferences internationally and across the US. Her books provide guidance f …Kahn Man’s Comedy Corner

Kahn Man’s Comedy Corner

7 YEARS AGOAn hour of funny music, mostly family friendly, inspired by the legendary Dr. Demento Show.#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench

8 DAYS AGOErin Davis along with co-host Lloyd Hetherington explore friendship, tragedy, love, life, learning and so much more on our Stories from the Green Bench podcast. The Green Bench is a symbol of elder wisdom. Physically or virtually, the bench invites us all to sit alongside a senior, share a conversation or give and offer advice. It challenges the stigma seniors face; the ageism still so prevalent in society. It reminds us of the wealth of wisdom our elders offer and in doing so, helps restore …JAMA Internal Medicine Author Interviews

JAMA Internal Medicine Author Interviews

23 DAYS AGOInterviews with authors of articles from JAMA Internal Medicine. JAMA Internal Medicine is an international peer-reviewed journal providing innovative and clinically relevant research for practitioners in general internal medicine and internal medicine subspecialties. We strive to publish articles that are stimulating to read, educate and inform readers with the most up-to-date research, and lead to positive change in our health care systems and the way we deliver patient care.TVH Health Chat

TVH Health Chat

7 WEEKS AGOEducational Health Podcast Series of Temecula Valley HospitalThe Untold

The Untold

4 WEEKS AGOGrace Dent presents a series documenting the untold dramas of 21st-century Britain.Conversations with my mother

Conversations with my mother

52 WEEKS AGOMy mum grew up in Britain during the Second World War and witnessed the winds of change as they blew through the decades. Mum has dementia now but is still very vibrant and full of sparkle.In this podcast, join me as I walk my mum down memory lane and through the history of her extraordinary life.Defiant Health Radio with Dr. William Davis

Defiant Health Radio with Dr. William Davis

2 DAYS AGOWilliam Davis, MD, cardiologist and author of the #1 New York Times bestselling Wheat Belly books, as well as Undoctored, brings the unvarnished truth about many health conditions. So much information in health is crafted by industry, bent to the benefit of healthcare systems, delivered by willfully ignorant physicians. Yet a critical mass of truly useful, safe, effective health information has been reached–but someone has to deliver it to you. That is Dr. Davis’ intention. Among the topics …Neuro Knowledge Podcast

Neuro Knowledge Podcast

2 YEARS AGOAn educational resource to provide information and dispel misconceptions amongst patients and families dealing with neurological diagnoses. We will tackle a diagnosis each podcast and discuss symptoms, diagnosis and treatment!The Open Drive

The Open Drive

29 DAYS AGOWelcome to the Open Drive a raw and honest podcast focused on authentic living and defining your own path in life against the odds. Hosted by me, Nick Ginsburg, I take you on a journey through my life so far. Raised by my parents, Mum and Louise (yes two mums!), I grew up in a family that was filled with addiction and mental health issues where I was the parent almost from birth. The odds were stacked against me, how could I grow up to be anything other than a replica of my parents? Let me t …The Voice Of Health

The Voice Of Health

4 DAYS AGOFor over 30 years, Dr Robert Prather has been transforming the lives of his patients at Holistic Integration, the top Structure Function medical practice in the United States. Tune in every week as he addresses health issues from back pain to vitamin deficiency and acupuncture to homeopathy. Each episode is created with education in mind, as Dr. Prather seeks to debunk common myths of the medical field, educate listeners on what holistic healthcare can and should look like, and clarify what …The Dr. Axe Show

The Dr. Axe Show

1 DAY AGOJoin Dr. Josh Axe as he explores nutrition, natural health, fitness and more with renowned special guests in the health and wellness industry on his new podcast, The Dr. Axe Show. Tune in every Tuesday for new episodes and make sure to subscribe and leave a review!Narratively Out Loud

Narratively Out Loud

14 DAYS AGOThe diverse human storytelling of Narratively.com, spoken out loud.Head & Heart

Head & Heart

20 DAYS AGOHonest conversations about mental health and faithDefining Dad Bod

Defining Dad Bod

24 DAYS AGOCoach Alex VanHouten is the owner and founder of two health and fitness companies — The Betterment Company and Defining Dad Bod and he brings 15 years of fitness industry experience to this epic podcast EVERY WEEK! Through “Defining Dad Bod” Coach Alex helps moms and dads with cutting edge nutrition, exercise, and lifestyle change designed optimize their bioindividuality and help them show up better for themselves and their families. He hosts THIS podcast to cut through the confusion of the …All Power To The Developing!

All Power To The Developing!

15 DAYS AGOA podcast of the East Side Institute, an international center for social change efforts that reinitiate human and community development. We support, connect and partner with committed and creative activists, scholars, artists, helpers and healers all over the world. In 2003, Institute co-founders Lois Holzman and the late Fred Newman had a paper published with the title “All Power to the Developing.” This phrase captures how vital it is for all people—no matter their age, circumstance, statu …Kendal Corporation – Lubetkin Media Companies LLC

Kendal Corporation – Lubetkin Media Companies LLC

12 YEARS AGOTelling Stories in Sound and ImagesConversations in Complexity

Conversations in Complexity

1 YEAR AGOThis is about challenges of complex care of patients with multimorbidity and patient caregiver involvementI Am Do Filmmaker

I Am Do Filmmaker

6 YEARS AGOUK filmmakers talking about making films.The Toad Elevating Moment

The Toad Elevating Moment

9 YEARS AGOWeekly radio show done on Dementia Radio now also a podcast. We play comedy music as well as talk about geeky things, recorded and streamed from I3 Detroit, a hacker space in Michigan.The Herald Podcasts

The Herald Podcasts

12 WEEKS AGOWelcome to The Herald’s podcast collection. We’ll be bringing you the latest political discussion and cultural conversations from across Scotland and catching up with some of the country’s leading experts.Internet Archive – Collection: SciFi_Horror

Internet Archive – Collection: SciFi_Horror

4 YEARS AGOThe most recent additions to the Internet Archive collections. This RSS feed is generated dynamicallyFrom My Mama’s Kitchen® Talk Radio

From My Mama’s Kitchen® Talk Radio

8 DAYS AGOFrom My Mama’s Kitchen® Talk Radio is based on the multi-award-winning & bestselling book, From My Mama’s Kitchen – “food for the soul, recipes for living” by Johnny Tan honoring his 9 moms. FMMK Talk Radio serves as a resource center vibrant with motivational, inspirational, and spiritual stories from guests of ordinary people especially moms doing extraordinary feats, instilling a positive attitude in our global community. Conversation topics address family matters, relationships, communit …Getting Explicit with Keyshia

Getting Explicit with Keyshia

3 YEARS AGOWelcome to the Blah blah blah with Keyshia podcast, where I speak out of my ass with no actual point. Do I have dementia?The Boo Crew

The Boo Crew

1 DAY AGOJoin your hosts Leone D’Antonio, Trevor Shand, and Lauren Shand as they bring you discussions and interviews covering all things horror! Our guests are not only icons from your favorite horror and genre films from in front of and behind the lens, but also artists, actors, musicians, authors and personalities inspired by horror and dark entertainment. A truly unique experience that has something for everyone.Talking Life

Talking Life

4 YEARS AGOCreated Out of Mind presents Talking Life, a series of podcast conversations with a person, or people, experiencing a dementia about their relationships with topics such as beauty, willpower, purpose, connection, and sleep. This series aims to engage listeners in collective conversations with people experiencing dementias about everyday subjects, challenging them to reconsider their initial assumptions about dementia. Presented by Susanna Howard, Music by Hannah Peel and edited by Erland Coo …Good Sitcom Ideas

Good Sitcom Ideas

4 YEARS AGOJoe Kenmore pitches his best sitcom ideas.Health Report – Separate stories podcast

Health Report – Separate stories podcast

2 DAYS AGOSpecialist and mainstream audiences alike rely on the Health Report to bring clarity to health and medical issues from social, scientific and political points of view.Nerve hope beyond brain disease

Nerve hope beyond brain disease

2 YEARS AGONerve is about living well with brain diseases like dementia, stroke and migraine, run by neurologists at http://www.sydcog.com.au who are inspired by their courageous patients. Mind and mood, memory and thinking, give us our unique experiences. Conversations will focus on quality, not just quantity, of life and motivate patients and carers alike.NOUS

NOUS

9 WEEKS AGONOUS tackles the deepest questions about the mind, through conversations with leading thinkers working in philosophy, neuroscience, psychiatry and beyond. Each episode features an in-depth conversation focussing on one big idea. How does the brain produce consciousness? Are mental illnesses just biological? Are there limits to the power of neuroscience – or will it eventually unravel the mysteries of free will and morality? Hosted by Ilan GoodmanAlzheimersQ

AlzheimersQ

5 YEARS AGOFive million Americans have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, a number that’s expected to increase to 15 million by 2050. The disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and disproportionally impacts minorities and women. Two out of three Alzheimer’s patents are women.BMJ talk medicine

BMJ talk medicine

30 WEEKS AGOPodcast by BMJ GroupExploring Mental Illness

Exploring Mental Illness

1 YEAR AGOExploring Mental Illness: Everything You Wanted To Know But Were Too Afraid To AskView Point

View Point

3 YEARS AGOWelcome to View Point. It’s a Podcast where you learn people’s stories and truly get to know it from their point of view.JournalSpotting.

JournalSpotting.

24 DAYS AGOGeneral Medicine Education Podcast to keep up to date with the latest and most important medical literature.Safe Space Radio

Safe Space Radio

41 WEEKS AGOSafe Space Radio is the show about subjects we’d struggle with less if we could talk about them more. We combine storytelling with empathy and expertise to foster courage in navigating challenging conversations and combating shame and stigma. Our new miniseries is Can We Talk?Conversations 2016

Conversations 2016

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FOXcast SLP

16 WEEKS AGOFOXcast SLP: a podcast for clinicians made by clinicians. It’s brought to you by FOX Rehabilitation. Find out more at foxrehab.org. The purpose of our show is to have professional conversations about SLP for older adults. (Tim Fox, PT, DPT, GCS | License #40QA00702100 | 7 Carnegie Plaza Cherry Hill, NJ 08003 | 877-407-3422)Healthy Senior Living with Smiles by Delivery

Healthy Senior Living with Smiles by Delivery

1 YEAR AGOConversations In Care

Conversations In Care

5 YEARS AGOConversations In Care the radio show providing you with a collection of care programs. Covering senior health topics, type 1 diabetes and everything inbetween. Using the simple act of conversation we can create awareness, establish a course of action and design a community of support.Revising on the Run

Revising on the Run

4 YEARS AGOWe’ve made Revising on the Run for medical students to learn on the go. We both love running, but you can listen to us at any time. Our first episode focusses on two topics in geriatric medicine – dementia and urinary incontinence. Have a listen, and let us know what you think!Mainstreet Halifax from CBC Radio

Mainstreet Halifax from CBC Radio

1 DAY AGOA vibrant blend of top news stories, local weather, traffic reports, comedy, local music, and interviews about politics, science and culture. Tune into Mainstreet on weekdays from 3 to 6 p.m. Add your voice by calling us at 1-888-686-MAIN (6246) or e-mail mainhfx@cbc.ca.Soundproofist

Soundproofist

6 DAYS AGOSoundproofist is a podcast about unwanted or harmful noise and what you can do about it. We also cover acoustics and people who work with sound.MediCave

MediCave

7 YEARS AGOHow the world around you is out to make you ill and how you can make it well.The Curious Case of Benjamin Button by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button by F. Scott Fitzgerald

28 WEEKS AGOA life lived backwards, with events happening in reverse order forms the strange and unexpected framework of one of F Scott Fitzgerald’s rare short stories. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button was published in Collier’s in 1927 and the idea came to Fitzgerald apparently from a quote of Mark Twain’s in which he regretted that the best part of life came at the beginning and the worst at the end. Fitzgerald’s concept of using this notion and turning the normal sequence of life on its head resul …Speaking of HomeGuard

Speaking of HomeGuard

7 DAYS AGO“Speaking of HomeGuard” shares upcoming National Rifle Association news, current events in the firearms industry both in Florida and around the nation, and vital information regarding your Second Amendment rights. Thank you for listening! Please share our podcast, visit our website and connect with us on Facebook. Rick WehrheimNeurosearch’s Podcast

Neurosearch’s Podcast

12 YEARS AGONeurosearch is setting new standards in the research of new treatments for Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. Our podcast is intended to provide listeners with a sense of hope and a better understanding of the exciting work that Neurosearch researchers are engaged in to fight neurodegenerative diseases.Drug Positive

Drug Positive

11 WEEKS AGODrug Positive is the risk reduction and benefit enhancement podcast reducing shame and stigma to save lives and end the drug war.Senior Care Conversations

Senior Care Conversations

3 YEARS AGOLooking to stay ahead in the booming elder care industry? Join Senior Care Conversations with Bluebird Homecare as we bring you news, insights, and stories about meeting the challenges of aging in America. Stuart Brunson, Bluebird Homecare Chairman & CEO, speaks with industry leaders and caregivers to highlight opportunities and challenges in providing healthy, independent home living for seniors across the country.This Old Cowgirl

This Old Cowgirl

3 YEARS AGOThis Old Cowgirl’s journey in moving back to my family farm.I moved back to the farm to care for my Dad who had Dementia so that he could stay on his beloved farm for as long as possible…which he did. He took his final breath here.The Legacy of family farms and ranches is what I am passionate about. We need to gather the stories of how our farms and ranches came to be. The stories of the hard times, the good times. When one of our farmers or ranchers passes away, all those stories and answ …The Graze

The Graze

1 YEAR AGOThe podcast of John LeFevre (former investment banker, Twitter personality, and best-selling author) and Robert Maxwell (founder of Houston-based Chowning Group) interviewing an eclectic group of guests spanning political figures, media personalities, professional athletes, business magnates, and thought-leaders.“Livin’ With Me” podcast

“Livin’ With Me” podcast

18 DAYS AGO“Livin’ With Me” podcast – pop culture, current events, conspiracy, “Black Mirror Rewind”, “Music of the Month”, rock n’ roll, 90’s podcasts and other showsOn The Merits

On The Merits

18 HOURS AGOBloomberg Law’s On The Merits brings you the biggest legal stories of the week, coupled with smart interviews and analysis on a variety of legal topics. You’ll hear voices and perspectives from across the legal industry, including reporters, editors, attorneys, legal scholars, and general counsel. And, from time to time, we’ll pull out a court filing or legal opinion from the week that, for whatever reason, piqued our interest. Host: David Schultz.The Morning Four

The Morning Four

1 YEAR AGOThe Morning Four is a weekday podcast that lasts 5 minutes or less and contains two fun facts, one feel-good news story and ends with an affirmation. Host Katie Parsons intends to start each day on the right foot, no matter what else is happening in the world.Cochrane Library Podcasts

Cochrane Library Podcasts

6 DAYS AGOCochrane produces systematic reviews which are recognized as the highest standard in evidence-based health care resources. Listen to Cochrane review authors explain in plain language the evidence and findings of their high-impact reviews. In 5 minutes or less, healthcare professionals to patients and families can understand the latest trusted evidence to help make better informed decisions.healthylivingradio’s Podcast

healthylivingradio’s Podcast

8 YEARS AGOHealthy Living from the Cooper Aerobics Center is designed for listeners of any age who want to gain research-based, practical information that can improve the way they look and feel. The program focuses on timely topics in the areas of health, fitness, nutrition, and lifestyle. The program features Dr. Ken Cooper along with members of the Cooper Aerobics Center staff and is hosted by Todd Whitthorne.It’s Time Podcast-Startup Inspiration, Entrepreneur Hustling to Build a Dream Business

It’s Time Podcast-Startup Inspiration, Entrepreneur Hustling to Build a Dream Business

5 YEARS AGOLearn about the ups and downs and lessons learned while starting a business . . . Oh, and did we mention that Bethanie is doing all of this while juggling a demanding life as a wife, mom, caregiver, and full time employee? Join Bethanie as she builds her company, Memnto, from scratch. Bethanie’s mother’s life inspired her to start her own business that will help us preserve our family histories, as she balances her already busy and full life. It’s real talk about the universal challenges tha …Oak Springs Chiropractic HealthNews

Oak Springs Chiropractic HealthNews

1 DAY AGOCourtesy of Oak Springs ChiropracticThe Art of Aging

The Art of Aging

24 HOURS AGOThe Art of Aging seeks to provide information and inspiration on how to improve our lives as we grow older. This podcast is produced by the Dayton Foundation Encore Fellows Initiative and the Ruth Frost Parker Center of Abundant Aging.The Pelvic Health Podcast

The Pelvic Health Podcast

26 DAYS AGOPodcast for professionals, as well as the general public, on all things related to pelvic health. Interviews with leading experts. Hosted by physiotherapist Lori Forner, BScH, MPhtySt, PhD candidateTeb Talks

Teb Talks

4 YEARS AGOWelcome to Teb Talks! Here’s a taste of what’s to come every fortnight as I put the world rights with my friends. I am taking on a personal mission to undo the taboo around so many everyday issues that women (and men) go through such as depression, jealously, miscarriage, taking back our cheating boyfriends, live at home adults, bikini waxes, periods….the list goes on. The things we talk about together in private but we don’t see reflected back at us in any public way!Research and insights from CPFT NHS FT

Research and insights from CPFT NHS FT

7 WEEKS AGOAt Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust (CPFT) we are dedicated to providing high quality care with compassion. We deliver many of the NHS services that are provided outside of hospital and in the community such as physical, mental health and specialist services. We provide integrated physical and mental health services for adults and older people; specialist mental health and learning disability services; children and young people’s mental health services; children’s communi …Food is Medicine with Patrick Holford

Food is Medicine with Patrick Holford

7 YEARS AGOPatrick Holford is a pioneer in new approaches to health and nutrition and is widely regarded as Britain’s best-selling author and leading spokesman on nutrition and mental health issues. With new discoveries about the links between nutrition and health coming to light every day, and newspapers reporting often conflicting information, these pod casts aim to give you reliable information on what to eat and supplement to help improve your health and prevent some of the most common diseases tod …ImperfectlyPerfect Podcast

ImperfectlyPerfect Podcast

2 DAYS AGOBe sure to join Founder and Creator; Glenn Marsden of the Global Imperfectly Perfect Campaign as seen though out international publications and networks sharing real life stories from real life people to unite them in global change for the face of mental health and reduce the stigma, creating communication, healing and awareness to save lives and inspire. Join Glenn weekly as he talks to some of the highly acclaimed faces, influencers, experts and those who have been through extreme adversity.ASU College of Health Solutions

ASU College of Health Solutions

2 YEARS AGOTalk about creating better health, health care outcomes and a new kind of health professional.Move or Improve with Debbie

Move or Improve with Debbie

9 DAYS AGOHost Debbie Miller discusses relevant topics about housing issues and how the Sandwich or Boomer Generation can decide what works best for them. Should they age-in-place or move? If they move, where should they go; and if they stay, then what should they do? She draws on decades of experience in real estate, remodeling, and senior housing to provide solutions for all ages.UCD Humanities Institute Podcast

UCD Humanities Institute Podcast

7 WEEKS AGOThis podcast series features recordings of academic papers from workshops, conferences and seminars in the University College Dublin Humanities Institute. The UCD Humanities Institute provides a creative architectural and conceptual space for interdisciplinary research in the humanities and allied disciplines. The Institute forms an integral element within UCD’s strategic mission to develop as a research intensive university and has set itself the objective of enhancing the critical mass and …Vital Presence – Shaping a new story

Vital Presence – Shaping a new story

43 WEEKS AGODon’t settle for someone else’s story about your life! Your 3rd Act of life is the time to be fully you. In our 3rd Act series. you’ll learn to thrive post-midlife; In our StoryPros series, you’ll learn how stories can transform your life in our StoryPros series. Sally Fox, Ph.D., veteran coach, consultant and writer interviews thought leaders who are shaping the narratives that are shaping the world. Find out more at http://www.vitalpresence.com.Transition Aging Parents

Transition Aging Parents

6 YEARS AGO“Transition Aging Parents” is a free radio show created and hosted by Dale Carter, founder of TransitionAgingParents.com. This show will focus on issues of caregiving, family communication, financial and estate issues, respite options, and first-person stories by older adults.The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

2 DAYS AGOExpert insight on health, performance, longevity, critical thinking, and pursuing excellence. Dr. Peter Attia (Stanford/Hopkins/NIH-trained MD) talks with leaders in their fields.DA Rockstars for Dental Assistants

DA Rockstars for Dental Assistants

1 DAY AGOThis podcast is for all the dental assistants out there ready to up their game to DA Rockstars!Get ready to catch some pearls of knowledge. #dentalassiatantsrockI Hear Design: the i+s podcast

I Hear Design: the i+s podcast

2 DAYS AGOI Hear Design is your source for interior design and architecture news, interviews and opinions. Send any questions to iheardesignpodcast@gmail.com Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/iandsdesign/supportWisdom of the Wounded

Wisdom of the Wounded

5 WEEKS AGOCaregiver support, sharing information and help when caring for someone suffering a life crisis – grief, illness, loss, relationship, death, old age, etc.Elevate Eldercare

Elevate Eldercare

9 HOURS AGONursing homes rarely garner positive attention, particularly from the media, and especially since the onset of COVID-19. Join Susan Ryan, senior director of The Green House Project, each Wednesday for enlightening, provocative, and sometimes uncomfortable conversations with thought leaders who offer diverse perspectives aimed at elevating eldercare. Susan and her guests explore the opportunities and challenges to actualizing a vision for dignified eldercare through the lens of the Green Hous …FMEC Podcasts

FMEC Podcasts

15 DAYS AGOThis is The Family Medicine Education Consortium, Inc. (FMEC) podcast channel. The FMEC connects those interested in improving the health of the community by strengthening Family Medicine/primary care services and medical education. Our primary area of focus is the northeast region of the U.S. We believe Family Medicine is critical to improving the health of the nation. We‘re working to achieve the full potential of Family Medicine.It’s Just Wallpaper

It’s Just Wallpaper

5 WEEKS AGOSince graduating with a Master’s Degree in Hospital Administration in 1972, I have had the opportunity to work in acute care hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living, retirement communities, home health, hospice and adult family homes. Along the way, I owned and operated a small multi-story nursing care and retirement facility, as well as four adult family homes.As the Director of multiple nursing homes, I was frequently asked about long-term care insurance. In order to provide credible inf …The New World Pictures Podcast

The New World Pictures Podcast

5 DAYS AGOThe New World Pictures Podcast is dedicated to every movie released by New World Pictures. Founded by the infamous Roger Corman, New World Pictures was responsible for all those movies that lived proudly in the back isles of the video store. From Death Race 2000 to Hellraiser, we talk about them all. We talk about every single movie and the history behind its production. Some movies are great. Some are bad. All of them are New World.Advances in Long Term Care Medicine

Advances in Long Term Care Medicine

10 YEARS AGOAdvances in Long Term Care Medicine is produced in cooperation with the American Medical Directors Association (AMDA), the only national organization representing long term care physicians and professionals. This series addresses the most relevant clinical and practice management issues facing those working in long term care settings.So What? Library and Information Science Podcast

So What? Library and Information Science Podcast

9 DAYS AGOA podcast about library and information science research, and why it matters. Created and managed by students at the Faculty of Information and Media Studies(FIMS)at Western University in London, Ontario, Canada.TED Talks Kids and Family

TED Talks Kids and Family

7 WEEKS AGOFun videos to inspire, intrigue and stir your imagination from some of the world’s leading thinkers and doers onstage at the TED conference, TEDx events and partner events around the world. You can also download these and many other videos free on TED.com, with an interactive English transcript and subtitles in up to 80 languages. TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading.Radio Health Journal

Radio Health Journal

3 DAYS AGOListen to Radio Health Journal to get the latest scoop on what’s trending in health, science and technology, and the intersection of medicine and public policy. Each week we speak with leading experts to break down the complex medical jargon and report on a timely topic. Did you know ecstasy could help to cure PTSD? What does “Medicare for All” really mean? These subjects and more with two stories weekly, plus Medical Notes – a short recap of the top medical headlines in the news. Hosted by …Kessler Foundation Podcasts

Kessler Foundation Podcasts

22 DAYS AGOKessler Foundation – Changing the lives of people with disabilities through research in stroke, brain injury, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury and by funding innovative programs that promote employment for people with disabilities. Podcasts are from various consumer and professional lectures presented by our researchers and guest lecturers.Vertical Hold: Behind The Tech News

Vertical Hold: Behind The Tech News

6 DAYS AGOWelcome to Vertical Hold: Behind The Tech News, where podcast hosts @alexkidman and @adam_turner speak to Australia’s leading technology journalists every Friday to get the stories behind the tech news of the week.NeuroFrontiers

NeuroFrontiers

4 WEEKS AGOClinical research and advancements furthering clinicians’ ability to diagnose and treat neurological disorders never stop. And neither does NeuroFrontiers, a series dedicated to covering them all. Here neurology specialists will find essential updates on conditions affecting the nervous system, spinal cord, and overall brain health. So if you want to stay up to date on the latest clinical research and news on neurological disorders, then look no further. Because NeuroFrontiers is where neuro …Nursing Today

Nursing Today

2 YEARS AGOThis lecture series features highly-rated talks by outstanding speakers who presented at University of Washington events. Earn contact hours as you listen to experts discuss healthcare trends, legal and professional issues, self-care, patient safety and best practice—with a focus on evidence-based nursing. UWCNE is proud to be accredited with distinction as a provider of Continuing Nursing Education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation (ANCC).OT Potential Podcast | Occupational Therapy CEUs

OT Potential Podcast | Occupational Therapy CEUs

19 DAYS AGOThis podcast is for occupational therapy practitioners and students looking to keep up with evidence based practice. Each month, we discuss one influential OT-related journal article which will be available for CEU credit when you join the OT Potential Club.FOXcast PT

FOXcast PT

6 WEEKS AGOFOXcast PT: the podcast for clinicians made by clinicians. It’s brought to you by FOX Rehabilitation. Find out more at foxrehab.org. The purpose of our show is to have professional conversations about PT for older adults. (Tim Fox, PT, DPT, GCS | License #40QA00702100 | 7 Carnegie Plaza Cherry Hill, NJ 08003 | 877-407-3422)Chicken Soup for the Soul with Amy Newmark

Chicken Soup for the Soul with Amy Newmark

8 HOURS AGOStart your days with inspiration and motivation from the best of Chicken Soup for the Soul and editor-in-chief Amy Newmark. There’s nothing like learning from the personal, revealing stories of other people. Amy shares her favorite stories and the wisdom, advice, and easy-to-implement tips that thousands of people have shared in 25 years of Chicken Soup for the Soul books. Tips and advice on Mondays and Wednesdays, and interviews with fascinating writers and influencers on Friend Fridays. It …Dr. Bond’s Life Changing Wellness

Dr. Bond’s Life Changing Wellness

12 DAYS AGODr. Bond’s Life Changing Wellness is an exciting and inspiring radio program that takes listeners into the world of nutrition, natural medicine and inspiring and uplifting stories to power your day ahead. Ward Bond, Ph.D. interviews exciting guests and experts from all areas of health, nutrition, music, film and television. With an incredible guest list this program is one you don’t want to miss. Subscribe today!Heart of Senior Care

Heart of Senior Care

25 WEEKS AGOGet ready to laugh, cry, and be inspired with the resilience of the human spirit. The Heart Of Senior Care podcast shares years of industry knowledge in a real way, designed for real people like you, while celebrating elders every day. By joining our community, you gain access to elder care consultant Kelly O’Connor on a personal level, enjoy weekly interviews with senior care professionals and caregivers, and ask questions in a safe space that reminds us all, we are not alone on the elder c …Live Forever Young

Live Forever Young

3 HOURS AGOTo Live Forever Young, health & knowledge should be your 2 Best Friends. Boomers Forever Young has been helping people with Powerful Stress Management Techniques, Life Hacks, Tips and Advanced Nutritional Knowledge since 2010. On Live Forever Young Radio you will become informed and inspired to help keep You, Living Your Best Life. We are guided by the belief that our services and products are an extension of our soul, and now we are excited to share with a whole New Audience. We dedicate Li …The Spark

The Spark

5 WEEKS AGOPresenting the people and stories behind medical education at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine and our community of learners.Real Talk with Laurie

Real Talk with Laurie

2 YEARS AGOReal Talk With Laurie with host Lauire Bowen shows her tenacity and determination as she brings guests who inspire and transform you; while Laurie’s humour and easy going nature will keep even the most depressing of topics, light. Laurie’s faith, compassion and capacity for empathy is her greatest strength and as you tune in you will feel immediately at ease when you call in, so give her a call – don’t be shy. Laurie Bowen has lived a life of trauma and abuse and yet she continues to rise. H …Neuro Pathways: A Cleveland Clinic Podcast for Medical Professionals

Neuro Pathways: A Cleveland Clinic Podcast for Medical Professionals

13 DAYS AGONeuro Pathways Podcast Description: A Cleveland Clinic podcast for medical professionals exploring the latest research discoveries and clinical advances in the fields of neurology and neurosurgery. Learn how the landscape for treating conditions of the brain, spine and nervous system is changing from experts in Cleveland Clinic’s Neurological Institute.The Staying Young Show 2.0 – Entertaining | Educational | Health & Wellness

The Staying Young Show 2.0 – Entertaining | Educational | Health & Wellness

1 YEAR AGOWith all the mixed messages on health, you need information that you can use and that you can trust. Listen in as the experts discuss all topics health related. It’s time to STAY YOUNG and stay healthy! Each week we tackle a topic and often with leading scientists, best selling authors, and even your favorite celebrities!Edge of Aging

Edge of Aging

5 WEEKS AGOA podcast that aims to open minds by examining aging, caregiving, and the intersection of healthcare as an opportunity to reshape how we partner in care. Thought leaders Cooper Linton and Nicole Clagett are reimagining aging and eldercare one idea at a time.JNNP podcast

JNNP podcast

9 DAYS AGOJNNP’s ambition is to publish the most ground-breaking and cutting-edge research from around the world. Encompassing the entire genre of neurological sciences, our focus is on the common disorders (stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, peripheral neuropathy, subarachnoid haemorrhage and neuropsychiatry), but with a keen interest in the Gordian knots that present themselves in the field, such as ALS. * The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content o …Caregiver SOS On Air

Caregiver SOS On Air

1 DAY AGOThis hour-long weekly radio show airs 6 p.m. Sundays on NewsTalk 930 (AM) KLUP in the Greater San Antonio region. Hosted by nationally recognized gerontologist Carol Zernial and veteran broadcaster Ron Aaron, and featuring author/psychologist Dr. James Huysman PsyD, LCSW, Caregiver SOS On Air explores issues important to you.FivesSquared’s podcast

FivesSquared’s podcast

3 YEARS AGOToday’s ever-changing business landscape requires companies to continually evolve by adopting increasingly smarter and more efficient solutions to remain competitive. Strategic work “on the business” and not just “in the business” must be a priority for leaders looking to drive measurable, strategic growth. FivesSquared specializes in integrated business and technology consulting driven by the belief: smart solutions must be developed based on strategic goals and driven by smart tools. From …NOUS

NOUS

9 WEEKS AGONOUS tackles the deepest questions about the mind, through conversations with leading thinkers working in philosophy, neuroscience, psychiatry and beyond. Each episode features an in-depth conversation focussing on one big idea. How does the brain produce consciousness? Are mental illnesses just biological? Are there limits to the power of neuroscience – or will it eventually unravel the mysteries of free will and morality? Hosted by Ilan GoodmanEvolving Past Alzheimer’s

Evolving Past Alzheimer’s

2 DAYS AGOWe are absolutely convinced that Alzheimer’s and other brain diseases are generally treatable and reversible. Early translational evidence supports this belief. The Evolving Past Alzheimer’s podcast brings you the highest caliber information about what you can do to identify, prevent, and treat Alzheimer’s disease. The show’s secondary goal is to use Alzheimer’s and cognition as a platform to explore consciousness and the human experience in it’s “second half of life.” Topics include emergin …Life After 50 Show

Life After 50 Show

44 WEEKS AGOIt’s what you need to know!The second half of your life may bring new challenges and opportunities. We are here to help you navigate Medicare, caring for aging parents or a spouse, retirement options, new employment options, health challenges and so much more. Let us know what you want more information about and we will be happy to provide. Your host Kathryn Watson brings in experts in all areas to interview. Listen to real people who offer real advice about living life to the fullest in the …David Essel Alive!

David Essel Alive!

50 WEEKS AGODavid Essel’s mission is to help you become more alive in every area of your life. David is a best-selling author, counselor, master life coach, all faiths minister, and inspirational speaker. Each week David will address issues that matter to you such as relationships, finances, depression, addiction, and anything that is keeping you from living your best life. Call in to share your story or to connect for help, motivation, and strategies to tackle the world today.“David is the radiant soul …Thoughtful Mind with Tzvi

Thoughtful Mind with Tzvi

1 YEAR AGOThoughtful Mind with Tzvi is a weekly podcast about Personal Growth, Mental Health, and Interesting Ideas. Each week, we talk about becoming a better person, address the pain in our lives, or spend time with a challenging thought. Along the way, we will talk about depression, anxiety, addiction, happiness, and how to find meaning in your life. Although Tzvi is the host, we’d like to hear what you have to say, and make it a part of the show! Contact us by email or voicemail, and visit the web …Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics

Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics

5 WEEKS AGOA selection of seminars and special lectures on wide-ranging topics relating to practical ethics. The Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics was established in 2002 with the support of the Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education of Japan. It is an integral part of the philosophy faculty of Oxford University, one of the great centres of academic excellence in philosophical ethics.Rotary Speakers

Rotary Speakers

7 YEARS AGOPublic presentations delivered at the weekly lunches of The Rotary Club of Dublin-WorthingtonGPWorks

GPWorks

1 YEAR AGOAgeSpace Podcast

AgeSpace Podcast

2 YEARS AGOA new podcast sharing advice on elderly care from AgeSpace.org.The Voice of the Patient

The Voice of the Patient

4 YEARS AGOThe mission of The Voice of the Patient is simple: To change lives, that is, to improve the care and quality of the lives we touch by improving healthcare through not only hearing, but truly listening to the voice of the patient.The LIONESS ROAR

The LIONESS ROAR

11 DAYS AGODo you want to achieve something great in your life? Do you lack the focus required to reach your goals? The Lioness embodies attitude, creativity, imagination, originality, vision, inspiration, resilience and resourcefulness. This podcast provides answers that will help you improve your confidence and performance and find the success you want! Each one of us has a dream, whether it is something enormous like winning an Olympic gold or something ordinary and more easily achieved, like owning …Thinking Philosophy

Thinking Philosophy

1 YEAR AGODelve into the world of ideas, ethics and deep reflection with philosophers committed to the examined life.WISERD Podcasts

WISERD Podcasts

3 YEARS AGOPodcast by WISERDBarbara Dicker orations

Barbara Dicker orations

2 YEARS AGOTrue Health Recovery

True Health Recovery

7 DAYS AGOHow many people do you know who struggle with their health? Chances are, whether they show it or not, most of the people in your life do. And chances are, you’re one of them — whether you’re dealing with anxiety, depression, endometriosis, pcos, acne, eczema, psoriasis, autoimmune, thyroid conditions, lyme disease, brain fog, or fatigue. You’re far from alone. Living with symptoms has become the new normal. Much of the time, people coexist with their ailments, accepting them and never questi …FOXcast OT

FOXcast OT

10 WEEKS AGOFOXcast OT: the podcast for clinicians made by clinicians. It’s brought to you by FOX Rehabilitation. Find out more at foxrehab.org. The purpose of our show is to have professional conversations about OT for older adults. (Tim Fox, PT, DPT, GCS | License #40QA00702100 | 7 Carnegie Plaza Cherry Hill, NJ 08003 | 877-407-3422)MediCave Podcast

MediCave Podcast

7 YEARS AGOTwo doctors take a look at the health news stories and issues that interest them. Humorous and informal, opinion-heavy and always entertaining,Tipping The Balance

Tipping The Balance

5 WEEKS AGOWe can all admit to wishing we had more balance in our lives. How many times have you said, “I just don’t have the right balance at the moment.” Maybe you think you need to work less, have more (or less!) time with your children, get outside more, exercise more, eat more healthily. What ever it is you and almost everyone else has an idea of what balance means to them, their lives and their mental health. ‘Tipping the balance,’ explores these concepts with a range of different people. Parents …Healthcare Innovation Podcast

Healthcare Innovation Podcast

3 YEARS AGOA dialogue with experts on the latest trends, developments, and ventures in the healthcare industry. Hosted by Zubin Kapadia, Global Healthcare Strategist.Psychiatry Unbound

Psychiatry Unbound

12 WEEKS AGOPsychiatry Unbound is APA Publishing’s Books podcast, hosted by APA Books Editor-in-Chief, Laura Roberts, M.D. It offers the opportunity to hear the voices behind the most prominent psychiatric scholarship in the field today. Subscribe now to learn about important topics in the field of psychiatry and see how our authors are making an impact in clinical settings throughout the world.beIN SPORTS

beIN SPORTS

20 WEEKS AGObeIN SPORTSProphet Jerome Fernando

Prophet Jerome Fernando

25 DAYS AGOProphet Jerome Fernando is a gifted minister of the five-fold ministry, a prolific preacher of God’s undiluted Word, an erudite teacher of deep revelations and called a ‘General of Faith’ by his spiritual parents Prophet Uebert Angel – the Godfather of the prophetic movement, and Prophetess Beverly Angel.Presiding over an ever exceedingly, expanding trilingual ministry in Sri Lanka and overseas, Prophet Jerome Fernando is the general overseer of the King’s Revival Church in Colombo Sri Lanka …Whole Health Empowerment Project- intuitive eating, weight loss over 40, food freedom, nutrition coach, health hacks, midlife, non scale victory

Whole Health Empowerment Project- intuitive eating, weight loss over 40, food freedom, nutrition coach, health hacks, midlife, non scale victory

24 HOURS AGOAre you 40 something or older who is sick and tired of making excuses about your health? Are you ready to get off the diet rat race and get onto a plan that creates food freedom and lifestyle transformation? Then this is the podcast for you! You know something needs to change. You feel pre-menopausal, hormonal, closer to the dreaded empty next stage, or are carrying around an extra 20-30 lbs. that you cannot seem to shake. Life is overwhelming between your job and your life and you feel too …Why Aren’t You A Doctor Yet?

Why Aren’t You A Doctor Yet?

17 WEEKS AGOJoin Hana, Suhail, Oz, and Alex for the podcast that mixes science and tech journalism and pop culture. With 2 PhDs and years of journalism between them, they dissect, discuss and dive into the most interesting stories, topics, and concepts in the world.Liverpool Life

Liverpool Life

7 YEARS AGOInterviews and reports about life in Liverpool. Produced by Pieter Droppert for a diploma in radio journalism.EMS In Wisconsin Podcast

EMS In Wisconsin Podcast

2 YEARS AGOProduced by the Professional Ambulance Association of Wisconsin (PAAW), this podcast is your source for EMS news, leadership & staff development topics, and coverage of the Midwest EMS Expo.How To OT

How To OT

49 WEEKS AGOWe are an occupational therapy (OT) podcast striving to narrow the research gap and help practitioners translate research into practice as simply as possible. We are shifting perspectives in OT research and practice from what happened, to how to make good things happen. We tell stories, portray OT culture, and identify principles for practitioners to improve the health outcomes of their clients.Iowa Geriatric Education Center GeriaCast

Iowa Geriatric Education Center GeriaCast

5 YEARS AGOThe Iowa Geriatric Education Center GeriaCast podcast covers a wide range of topics in the clinical management of older adults. It is of particular value and importance to health practitioners who work with older adults.Aged Care Executive Podcast

Aged Care Executive Podcast

2 YEARS AGOThe show that’s dedicated to helping aged and community care professionals stay ahead of the industry. The residential aged and community industry can be complex! Not only do we need to provide great healthcare outcomes, but to survive we need to excel at customer service, be able to attract and retain great staff, get the right levels of funding, keep costs down, and all while deal with a lot of regulatory compliance. So join us for a weekly show where we’ll be interviewing leaders in their …Vital Presence – Shaping a new story

Vital Presence – Shaping a new story

43 WEEKS AGODon’t settle for someone else’s story about your life! Your 3rd Act of life is the time to be fully you. In our 3rd Act series. you’ll learn to thrive post-midlife; In our StoryPros series, you’ll learn how stories can transform your life in our StoryPros series. Sally Fox, Ph.D., veteran coach, consultant and writer interviews thought leaders who are shaping the narratives that are shaping the world. Find out more at http://www.vitalpresence.com.Reimagine STEM

Reimagine STEM

48 WEEKS AGOWhat does the future hold for engineering and computer science education? How can we address the vexed question of diversity and gender in STEM? How are the world’s oldest cultures intrinsically connected to tech today and how can STEM remain proactively engaged with social benefit as we plan for the uncertain future of humanity and the wider world? All this and more on Reimagine STEM, the podcast of the ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science.It’s Just Wallpaper

It’s Just Wallpaper

5 WEEKS AGOSince graduating with a Master’s Degree in Hospital Administration in 1972, I have had the opportunity to work in acute care hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living, retirement communities, home health, hospice and adult family homes. Along the way, I owned and operated a small multi-story nursing care and retirement facility, as well as four adult family homes.As the Director of multiple nursing homes, I was frequently asked about long-term care insurance. In order to provide credible inf …Advances in Long Term Care Medicine

Advances in Long Term Care Medicine

10 YEARS AGOAdvances in Long Term Care Medicine is produced in cooperation with the American Medical Directors Association (AMDA), the only national organization representing long term care physicians and professionals. This series addresses the most relevant clinical and practice management issues facing those working in long term care settings.Our Pets Health: with Dr Alex

Our Pets Health: with Dr Alex

2 YEARS AGOIt can be tough to know the best way to look after your dog or cat. Join veterinarian Dr. Alex for a weekly dose of pet health advice, news, and discussion. Want to give your pet the best care possible? Then you need to listen and subscribe!Faith & Good Counsel Show with Staci Gulino

Faith & Good Counsel Show with Staci Gulino

2 YEARS AGOThe Faith and Good Counsel Show features topics at the crossroads of mental health, wellness and faith, with the mission to inspire hope and Christian virtue in the lives of women, their families, and relationships. The show is hosted by Staci Gulino, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner, Speaker, Writer, Educator, and Media Producer.Who Cares? – the future of home care

Who Cares? – the future of home care

32 WEEKS AGOGet in on the conversation about the future of home care. We’re talking with innovators and thought leaders in the home care industry and other experts along the care continuum. Who Cares? is produced and presented by Honor. Let’s learn together so we can work together—and improve home care for everyone.Profit Boss® Radio – THE Podcast for Women and Money

Profit Boss® Radio – THE Podcast for Women and Money

33 WEEKS AGOProfit Boss® Radio is a weekly wealth building and retirement mastermind for women and couples. Want the secrets to wealth and retirement to be yours? This is the place. Hosted by Hilary Hendershott, CFP®, MBA, a fiduciary financial advisor running a leading advisory firm, she inspires and empowers listeners on their financial and professional journeys by sharing real stories from real life and real people who are reaching financial success. Let Hilary be your guide as you defy the odds, tak …ICS Independence Radio

ICS Independence Radio

2 YEARS AGOIndependence Radio is a series of conversations with members of the ICS community about issues of health care and independent living for people with disabilities and older adults. Independence Radio is a broadcast of Independence Care System, a community-based, nonprofit agency serving the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens. Independence Care System is dedicated to supporting senior adults and adults with physical disabilities and chronic conditions to live at home and participate fully i …Wild Angel: The Films of Roger Corman

Wild Angel: The Films of Roger Corman

5 YEARS AGOI’m a movie fanatic bringing you a podcast dedicated to the movies of the legendary Roger Corman. Each episode will take an in-depth look at seminal titles in the Corman filmography offering background information, trivia and reviews. Entertaining and informative for any fans of classic low budget cinema.RSVP Northern Virginia Podcast

RSVP Northern Virginia Podcast

1 YEAR AGORSVP is America’s largest volunteer network for people age 55 and older. In Northern Virginia, RSVP volunteers are responding to community needs in and around Fairfax County, Arlington County, and the City of Alexandria. Individuals choose how, where, and how often they want to serve, with commitments ranging from a few hours to 40 hours per week. RSVP is a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS). RSVP-Northern Virginia is sponsored by Volunteer Fairfax in partne …Beyond Driving with Dignity

Beyond Driving with Dignity

36 WEEKS AGOAre you worried about an aging loved-one’s safe driving abilities? Do you think mom’s driving skills might be slipping as a result of the natural aging process? Does dad’s driving cause you to worry? Are your children afraid to get in the car with grandma? Then you’ve come to the right place! The Beyond Driving With Dignity podcast will help you work through all these concerns. Listen in as Matt Gurwell and his national team of Certified “Beyond Driving with Dignity” Professionals work to he …The Red Card Club

The Red Card Club

22 WEEKS AGOTalking Rugby. Worldwide. Talking rugby with former All Black Sam Tuitupou and Samoan International Dan Leo and a range of international guests, hosted by Simon Kidney, the Red Card Club takes a refreshingly frank approach to the world of rugby and red cards they have earned along the way. Tackling Rugby, Worldwide. Tackling rugby’s more controversial topics, in between the banter, Sam, Dan, Simon and their guests are unafraid to take a warts-and-all look at the issues that undermine the spo …Kids Eating Broccoli Podcast with Dr. Brad Ellisor – Children’s Health, Family Health

Kids Eating Broccoli Podcast with Dr. Brad Ellisor – Children’s Health, Family Health

2 YEARS AGOWelcome to the Kids eating broccoli podcast where we believe that raising healthy kids shouldn’t be complicated. Our mission is to inspire 20 million families worldwide to take the steps to raise the healthiest generation in our history. We interview some of the world’s leading experts in nutrition, human potential and children’s health as well as extraordinary chefs and foodies, to gain insights into simple, fun and creative ways to introduce natural health into homes across this planet.EBN podcast

EBN podcast

17 WEEKS AGOPublished quarterly, the purpose of Evidence-Based Nursing is to select from the health-related literature research studies and reviews that report important advances relevant to best nursing practice. The clinical relevance and rigour of the studies are assessed to identify research that is relevant to nursing. A commentary on chosen articles identifies the key findings and implications for clinical practice. The RCNi and the BMJ publish Evidence-Based Nursing under the editorship of Profes …BMJ Open podcast

BMJ Open podcast

6 YEARS AGOBMJ Open is an online, open access journal, dedicated to publishing medical research from all disciplines and therapeutic areas. The journal publishes all research study types, from study protocols to phase I trials to meta-analyses, including small or specialist studies. Publishing procedures are built around fully open peer review and continuous publication, publishing research online as soon as the article is ready.BMJ Open aims to promote transparency in the publication process by publis … 

Lewy Body Dementia Preparing For End Stage End Of Life Care

Lewy Body Dementia
Lewy Body Dementia

As stated in our blog declaration we will always try our very best to search and find the latest up to date information available wherever we can find it upon the web so that you can access it more easily all in one place.

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Dated May 7, 2020

This webinar was recorded and can be viewed for free on YouTube here.

Source Stanford PD Community Blog

The presentation began with an acknowledgment from Dr. Katz about the presentation: these are difficult topics that may be sad or challenging to think about.

Still, it is important to have this kind of information to help you plan and prepare for the future. Topics included what caregiving is like in advanced LBD, end-of-life care, indicators of the individual’s prognosis, and advance care planning.

Within the palliative care field, there is a concept called “total pain,” which posits that the physical pain experienced by the sick individual is only part of all the suffering caused by the disease.

The illness impacts the entire family, including the caregiver, and all family members may experience suffering in the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual realms. Unfortunately, physicians rarely bring up end-of-life issues, and less than half of caregivers say they felt prepared for what was to come.

Caregiving in advanced LBD is very challenging and often causes grief, guilt, and existential distress. 

Anticipatory grief, a feeling of mourning for an expected future that has been lost, is common. Most caregivers at this stage of illness never feel that they are doing a good enough job of caregiving, even though they are.

This feeling of guilt is common and is a normal part of the situation that should be acknowledged. Finding support from a friend circle, support group, faith community, or family is essential. Spiritual care or counseling can be very helpful for the caregiver, family, and person with LBD during this time, to help find perspective.

Resilience isn’t only about enduring; it’s about how you are able to recharge and bounce back. It is not about becoming stoic and being able to endure an increasingly burdened situation; rather, it is about your ability to take a break and recover from a challenging situation.

Caregiver burnout is real: it affects health outcomes and leads to higher mortality in caregivers. Burnout is a healthy, adaptive response – an alarm to notify us that something needs to change before this gets worse. It’s important to notice the alarm is ringing, often by practicing mindfulness and self-care.

What does self-care look like?

  • Monitor yourself for signs of caregiver burnout: feelings of exhaustion, irritation, or frustration.
  • Promote your own well-being and seek balance.
  • Think of it as putting on your own “oxygen mask” on before you help others.
  • Build resilience in yourself.
  • Strengthen meaning and purpose in life: remember why you have chosen to care for this person.
  • Connect with yourself and with others: “connection is protection.”
  • Broaden your understanding of your options and choices (self-efficacy): remember that you do have a choice in how you handle situations, even if they are quite difficult.

Palliative care focuses on improving the quality of life of patients and their families facing serious illness. It seeks to affirm life and provide relief from pain, while offering a support system to the family and the patient. While palliative care services can be particularly essential later in the disease, increasingly it is recognized as having great value earlier in the course of the illness as well. In some studies, palliative care not only improved the quality of life, but also the length of life.

Motor symptoms

Increased slowness and stiffness can cause discomfort and pain and can lead to contractures. Contractures are stiffness or constriction in the muscles, tendons, or ligaments, which prevent the extremity from moving and can cause severe pain. Falls often increase due to the loss of balance and impulsivity. Supervision around-the-clock becomes necessary. Patients become wheelchair-dependent, and, eventually, many will become bedridden.

There are a number of strategies and techniques to manage these issues:

  • Range of motion exercises (independent or assisted) and massage to help prevent contractures
  • Skin care to ensure skin is clean and dry
  • Change positioning every 2 hours to prevent formation of pressure ulcers
  • Use a gait belt to help walk and transfer safely
  • Mechanical lifts may be needed eventually
  • Use specialized cushions or mattress to prevent pressure ulcers
  • Broda specialized positioning and mobility chairs

Dr. Katz mentioned a 2019 study in the New England Journal of Medicine entitled “Rehabbed to Death,” which found that for a minority of older adults, sometimes a stay in rehab facility after a hospitalization is actually a gateway into a cycle that sends the individual from the rehab facility back to the hospital, then back to rehab, in their final months of life. The rehab facility in this case is not really able to “rehabilitate” or improve the person’s health or quality of life; more accurately, this should be called “post-acute” care. This can be in part due to payment structures within Medicare and Medicaid that perpetuate the cycle, and it does not generally represent a good quality of life for someone in their final months or weeks.

If your loved one with LBD is hospitalized and you are recommended to send them to sub-acute rehab, it is more of a post-acute care convalescent home rather than a rehab facility. It is something to be aware of.

Communication

In advanced LBD, communication often becomes quite difficult. Voice changes, poor attention, confusion, and word-finding problems are common; impaired communication can also lead to anxiety or agitation.

Some basic tips:

  • Say “yes, and…” – do not argue, even if they are hallucinating or confused.
  • Speak clearly in a calm voice. Tone is often more important than content. Be aware of your tone and facial expressions.
  • Ask “yes” or “no” questions rather than open-ended questions.
  • Maintain eye contact.
  • Offer a reassuring response to frequently asked questions.
  • Find a place and time to talk without distractions.
  • Refer to people by their names instead of pronouns like he or she, to avoid confusion.
  • Talk about one thing at a time.
  • Have patience.
  • When giving instructions, use simple sentences – one piece of information at a time.
  • Recognize what you’re up against.
  • Understand that there will be good days and bad days.

Psychiatric symptoms

Those with advanced LBD often experience hallucinations that may be severe and frightening. Make their neurologist and psychiatrist aware if this is happening.

Behavioral treatments include figuring out or anticipating some possible triggers of the hallucinations or agitation. Cover reflective surfaces, as mirror images are often disturbing to those with advanced LBD. Use a calm tone of voice and avoid confrontation.

At the end of life, hallucinations and psychosis are often so severe that they need medication treatments to help control the symptoms.

The “Five R’s” from the Family Caregiver Handbook:

  • Remain calm.
  • Respond to the person’s feelings.
  • Reassure the person.
  • Remove yourself.
  • Return when you are calm.

Eating and taking medications

Most people will need help with feeding once the disease is advanced. Keep the patient as involved and independent as they can be; finger foods can sometimes allow them to feed themselves for longer than a fork and knife. Using a plate in a contrasting color can help your loved one to be able to distinguish the food from the plate. Always position them in the upright position when eating, and continue to sit upright for 20-30 minutes after a meal.

Sometimes, those with LBD may refuse to eat due to confusion or hallucinations. They may also experience swallowing problems, such as choking, aspirating food into the lungs, or forgetting how to swallow so that food stays in the mouth.

Recommendations:

  • Do not use thickeners; evidence shows they can actually worsen quality of life.
  • Try carbonated beverages.
  • Try smoothie-consistency drinks; thin liquids are most difficult.
  • Give medications with applesauce or something of a similar consistency.
  • Alternate between a bite of food and a sip of fluid.
  • Have them do a chin tuck when swallowing.
  • Benevolent trickery is sometimes necessary.

Weight loss

Weight loss is expected for those with LBD and is an indication of end-stage disease. Anorexia (lack of eating) and cachexia (weakness and wasting of the muscles) are common. It may seem counter-intuitive, but high-calorie supplements or appetite stimulants will not help with these issues and can actually worsen quality and quantity of life. It can be very hard to see the number on the scale continuing to drop, but it’s not something we can fix – it’s a hallmark of end-stage LBD.

Toileting and incontinence

Give your loved one as much privacy and independence as is consistent with their safety. Give them extra time, assess if they need help, and acknowledge that it may be uncomfortable or embarrassing for them. Timed voiding – visiting the bathroom at regular times throughout the day – can be very helpful to keep them comfortable and avoid accidents. A pad inside the absorbent briefs can provide extra protection. The Liberty catheter is an external catheter that goes on at bedtime, which can be helpful. Consider keeping a urinal or commode at the bedside so they do not have to get up to the bathroom overnight.

Dental care

It’s important to continue dental care. Brush teeth twice a day; eventually, they will likely need assistance with this task. A little bit of lemon juice can aid in swallowing and help clean the palate.

Practices to avoid in advanced LBD

In the past, patients with swallowing difficulties were often given thickened liquids. However, recent studies have shown this is actually a harmful practice and should not be continued! Thickened liquids are generally so unpalatable that people often refuse to drink them, which can lead to dehydration and kidney damage.

Feeding tubes are another practice in those with dementia that have now been shown to be counter-productive: artificial nutrition does not prolong or improve life for those with advanced dementia. Rather, assisted oral feedings are the best course. Post-operative pain and infection after feeding tube insertion, as well as increased likelihood of delirium and repeat surgeries, are some of the reasons why this practice is no longer recommended. Caregiver burden often increases as well.

Fluctuations in alertness

As LBD progresses, individuals will have more and more fluctuations of alertness. This often presents as seeming “zoned out” for a few minutes, and then they come back to normal. It is not a medical emergency, and there is no known treatment.

End-of-life care: Days to weeks

At this point, most people are bedridden. Focus on creating comfortable surroundings. Bring nature indoors, if possible, and play your loved one’s favorite music. Soothing touch, such as a gentle massage, can be relaxing and pleasurable. Smells such as lavender oil can be pleasant as well.

In terms of medications, if Sinemet (carbidopa-levodopa) has been helpful for them, continue it for as long as possible. Reduce other medications to only what is necessary, or will help them remain comfortable. If liquid formulations of medications are available, switch to those; if the person is unable to swallow, then suppositories may be the best option. Most patients at this stage of LBD will need sedating medications to control the agitation and psychosis that generally increase at the end of life.

Prognostic indicators in LBD

There are certain indicators that provide a prognosis – the likely course or time frame of late-stage LBD. These indicators are used by Medicare to determine eligibility for hospice services, which require an estimate of six months or less of life.

For those with weight loss, these are the same criteria as for “Adult Failure to Thrive,” a different medical diagnosis. The main criteria for hospice eligibility are a body mass index (BMI) of less than 22, and a score on the Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) of 40 or less, indicating someone who is mainly in bed and needs assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs). These two factors are strong indicators that someone is likely within 6 months of the end of their life, and should receive hospice services to ensure the best care.

For those with dementia, hospice eligibility requires at least one of the following in the past 12 months:

  • Aspiration pneumonia
  • Pyelonephritis (kidney infection)
  • Septicemia (infection of the blood)
  • Stage 3 or 4 pressure ulcers
  • Recurrent fever
  • 10% weight loss (or greater) in the past 12 months
  • Albumin less than 2.5 mg/dL (measurement of protein indicating malnutrition) and greater than or equal to 7C on the FAST scale:
  1. Speaks 5-6 words per day
  2. Speaks only 1 word clearly per day
  3. Cannot walk without personal assistance
  4. Cannot sit up without personal assistance
  5. Can no longer hold up head independently

What do people die of in LBD?

There have been very few studies on this question. For most, aspiration pneumonia – a lung infection caused by inhaling food or oral secretions into the lungs – is the cause of death. Sometimes aspiration pneumonia leads to sepsis, an extreme reaction by the body in response to a systemic infection, which can be fatal. Reduced mobility, falls, or fractures can also be life-threatening. Failure to thrive, which is the severe weight loss associated with late-stage dementia, is another cause as well.

Hospice care: Role of the neurologist

Right now, only about 5% of patients with LBD will receive hospice services

It’s important that more LBD patients and families receive the help and care available to them through hospice. Your loved one’s neurologist can still play a helpful role even after hospice is involved, by helping to communicate and coordinate with the hospice team and educating them about the specific needs of LBD patients, such as medications that are commonly used in a hospice setting, but which should NOT be given to those with LBD.

Medications to avoid in hospice patients with LBD:

  • Haloperidol (Haldol)
  • Metoclopramide
  • Phenergan

Alternative medications that are safer to use in LBD are quetiapine (Seroquel) for agitation/psychosis and ondansetron (Zofran) for nausea.

The Advance Healthcare Directive is a legal document that allows an individual to spell out their preferences for life-saving medical interventions and end of life care, ahead of time, and designates an individual who is empowered to make healthcare decisions on their behalf, if necessary. This requires that you speak with the loved one about their wishes while they are still able to consider such decisions.

www.prepareforyourcare.org

Most people who go into cardiac arrest are not able to be resuscitated successfully; only 5% of people with dementia who undergo CPR survive. It is not like the movies; the chances of a good recovery are actually quite small, contrary to the portrayal in the movies. The POLST (Physician’s Order for Life Sustaining Treatment) is a form, usually yellow, that tells emergency professionals what to do in a crisis when the patient cannot speak for themselves.

Dr. Katz cited a quote from the book Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande, MD:

“… Our most cruel failure in how we treat the sick and the aged is the failure to recognize that they have priorities beyond merely being safe and living longer.”

Two questions to ask around advance care planning:

  • If you look ahead, what worries you the most?
  • When you look to the future, what are you hoping for? (in addition to a cure)

“Our ultimate goal, after all, is not a good death, but a good life to the very end.” – Atul Gawande, MD

Lewy Body Dementia: A Doctor’s Story

Lewy Body Dementia
Lewy Body Dementia

Below we post yet another touching and revealing personal testimony from a doctor concerning Lewy Body Dementia.

When I finished my training, I was taught that the vast majority of dementia was Alzheimer’s disease, with occasional cases of multi-infarct dementia as well as odd syndromes such as Kreutzfeld-Jacob disease and genetic, traumatic, toxic and tumor-related syndromes.

Parkinson’s disease, we were taught, caused a tremor and freezing up of a person’s movements and only very rarely was associated with any kind of memory loss.

These teachings helped us modern doctors leave behind terms such as “senility” or “hardening of the arteries” to explain cognitive loss. We still had no useful tools to change the course of dementia, but we were more scientific in our description of it.

In the last several years, however, neurologists have determined that there is a very common dementia that is associated with Parkinson’s disease.

Lewy body disease or Lewy body dementia was a condition that I had been taught was not only uncommon but only accurately diagnosed at autopsy or with a brain biopsy.

It appears, now, that it is quite common, comprising up to 30% of cases of dementia.

It is more common in men than in women, like Parkinson’s disease but not like Alzheimer’s disease and is more common in people who have higher educational attainment.

It is characterized by collections of protein known as Lewy bodies that are found throughout the cerebral cortex, rather than just in the movement centers of the midbrain, as in Parkinson’s disease.

There are some medical tests that will help to diagnose Lewy body disease, but they are not commonly performed. It is most commonly diagnosed by the identifying 2 of 4 common clinical features. These are:

  1. Fluctuating cognition with varying levels of consciousness and alertness. They will fall deeply asleep and be unarousable or be very slow and confused, lasting hours sometimes, then improve to a more normal baseline, laughing and participating in conversations. Family will sometimes think they have had a stroke or a seizure.
  2. Visual hallucinations. These may be quite detailed.
  3. REM sleep disorder. Patients will often talk in their sleep or do complex movements, often getting up and walking or performing complex behaviors. This can be disturbing and even dangerous to a bed partner.
  4. Motor features of Parkinson’s, including pill-rolling tremor, slow movements and rigidity. These features almost always follow the development of memory loss.

Patients have other clinical features such as depression, anxiety, apathy and loss of executive function (unable to clean a closet, sort and pay bills or put together a photo album.) They often have autonomic dysfunction, with fainting spells due to drop in blood pressure or inability to tolerate changes in temperature. They become unstable in their walking or standing and fall frequently. They have urinary incontinence. They have delusions that are detailed and hard to shake.

My father had this and I didn’t recognize it until about 3 months before his death.

He was a very smart man, having graduated in physics from Caltech and then worked with early computers and was an important part of the space program. He worked on developing electric cars and wind power and studied the feasibility of oil shale and tar sands (not feasible and not efficient, he concluded.)

He brought a supercomputer to the island of Maui and helped jump-start their technology industry. He was funny and engaging and had a knack for encouraging others by being a springboard for their ideas. He was the most compelling conversationalist I have ever known and played a mean game of scrabble.

When he lost his wife to cancer 12 years ago he began to notice some disturbing memory failures. He put those down to the stresses of home hospice and the depression that followed her death. He was capable with his laptop computer and enjoyed the early handheld computing devices, but when he got his first smartphone, the technology became more difficult for him to learn.

He could use email, but forgot how it worked and never learned to access it with his iPhone. He took on the position of board president with an academic organization and wasn’t able to keep up with what he needed to do. He resigned and felt terrible about that. He tried to take blood pressure medication but would pass out unexpectedly so stopped it. He kept all of his mail and couldn’t figure out how to file it, feeling ashamed about the state of his desk. He flailed and talked in his sleep so much that his wife had to go to bed elsewhere. He would wake up at 4 in the morning, inconsolably sure that he needed to catch a plane or teach a class.

He fell frequently and when he walked or stood, would lean to one side, unaware that he was doing it. It was nerve-wracking to walk with him because he refused to take an arm and never learned to use a walker or cane. He slept more, often while sitting up, and had periods of unresponsiveness that were alarming. His falls were not minor and he gashed his face and ripped the skin on his arms, broke his hand and hit his head hard enough to spend an agitated night in the hospital. His writing became small, shaky and cramped.

It was clear he had dementia and that it wasn’t a normal kind. He saw a neurologist who thought he might have Parkinson’s disease and a wonderful gerontologist who diagnosed Alzheimer’s disease. His wife, who had been attending a dementia support group, had heard about how common Lewy body dementia was and suggested it might be that. I read the most recent literature and decided she was right. Not only did he have it, so had many of my patients over the years who I had thought had Alzheimer’s disease.

The fluctuations. The falls. The detailed hallucinations and delusions. The executive dysfunction. It isn’t subtle how different it is from Alzheimer’s disease. These are the people who come into the emergency department frequently when they are clearly worse than normal but improve overnight and return home, even though we think that’s a bad idea. They do fine until they fluctuate again and then are back. These are the difficult to handle patients with the mean delusions who drive their families or spouses nuts but are unmanageable in nursing homes. If Alzheimer’s disease were vanilla ice cream, Lewy body dementia would be rocky road, with real rocks.

My father was a sweet guy but this disease made him critical, unkind and selfish. But only sometimes. Only when we were so deliberately stupid that we didn’t understand that his reputation would be ruined if he didn’t get to the airport or to the lecture he was supposed to be giving. Only if we tried to help him walk when he could clearly do it better without our pushing him off balance. Only when he woke up scared and didn’t understand what was going on. At other times he was kind and appreciative and full of sweetness, humor and wisdom that he could no longer put express with words.

It was possible for him to stay at home with his wife for a long time with the help of caregivers. Eventually, however, the combination of impulsiveness, weakness and sleep disturbance made even 24 hour caregiver support inadequate and he had to be moved to a memory care center.

The facility was really wonderful, catering to the dotty, delirious and demented, many of them with what appeared to be Lewy body dementia. He perked up briefly after moving, but then began to sleep more, sitting up in his wheelchair. He still had up times, explaining the chemical properties of tungsten, listening to a talk I needed to practice and offering good questions. He became weaker, unable to hold a cup or a fork, barely able to lift a cookie. Eventually he didn’t wake up at all and two days later died peacefully, in the care of hospice.

Since his diagnosis, I have been much more aware of those demented people who don’t have Alzheimer’s disease. It helps to know, so we don’t compare them unfavorably. They aren’t just difficult people with dementia, they are regular people with difficult dementia.

Robin Williams, the gifted actor and comedian, developed a set of disturbing symptoms in the last years of his life that were unexplained but progressive and horrible. He said goodnight to his wife one evening (she slept in a separate room because of his sleep behaviors), went to his bedroom and hung himself. An autopsy showed severe Lewy body dementia. She wrote a letter to the journal Neurology detailing their medical odyssey. It is heartbreaking to read.

We have no useful treatments for Lewy body dementia. Sometimes benzodiazepines help a bit with the sleep disorder, but my experience was that they did nothing. Anti-psychotic medication is not helpful and often can worsen the symptoms significantly. Parkinson’s medication can help with the rigidity and tremor, but my experience was that, by the time that was prominent it was more helpful for my father not to have the ability to act out his impulsivity. A wheelchair was much safer. Cholinesterase inhibitors, used in Alzheimer’s disease, are recommended but don’t help much and can cause sleep problems, nausea and drooling.

I will miss my father. I will think about his voice, his conversation, his smile, his love of math and his scientific contributions. I will remember his smell, his wispy white hair and the way he loved to have his back scratched hard. I will not miss his last 6 months, though, and I resent those nasty Lewy bodies that infested his wonderful brain.

Dr. Janice M. Boughton is an internist in Moscow, Idaho and is affiliated with multiple hospitals in the area, including Gritman Medical Center and Good Shepherd Health Care System-Hermiston. She received her medical degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 20 years.

Susan Williams: The Terrorist Inside My Husband’s Brain. Lewy Body Dementia.

Lewy Body Dementia (2)

We post the personal testimony of Susan Schneider Williams, widow of the late Robin Williams.

I am writing to share a story with you, specifically for you. My hope is that it will help you understand your patients along with their spouses and caregivers a little more. And as for the research you do, perhaps this will add a few more faces behind the why you do what you do. I am sure there are already so many.

This is a personal story, sadly tragic and heartbreaking, but by sharing this information with you I know that you can help make a difference in the lives of others.

As you may know, my husband Robin Williams had the little-known but deadly Lewy body disease (LBD). He died from suicide in 2014 at the end of an intense, confusing, and relatively swift persecution at the hand of this disease’s symptoms and pathology. He was not alone in his traumatic experience with this neurologic disease. As you may know, almost 1.5 million nationwide are suffering similarly right now.

Although not alone, his case was extreme. Not until the coroner’s report, 3 months after his death, would I learn that it was diffuse LBD that took him. All 4 of the doctors I met with afterwards and who had reviewed his records indicated his was one of the worst pathologies they had seen. He had about 40% loss of dopamine neurons and almost no neurons were free of Lewy bodies throughout the entire brain and brainstem.

Robin is and will always be a larger-than-life spirit who was inside the body of a normal man with a human brain. He just happened to be that 1 in 6 who is affected by brain disease.

Not only did I lose my husband to LBD, I lost my best friend. Robin and I had in each other a safe harbor of unconditional love that we had both always longed for. For 7 years together, we got to tell each other our greatest hopes and fears without any judgment, just safety. As we said often to one another, we were each other’s anchor and mojo: that magical elixir of feeling grounded and inspired at the same time by each other’s presence.

One of my favorite bedrock things we would do together was review how our days went. Often, this was more than just at the end of the day. It did not matter if we were both working at home, traveling together, or if he was on the road. We would discuss our joys and triumphs, our fears and insecurities, and our concerns. Any obstacles life threw at us individually or as a couple were somehow surmountable because we had each other.

When LBD began sending a firestorm of symptoms our way, this foundation of friendship and love was our armor.

The colors were changing and the air was crisp; it was already late October of 2013 and our second wedding anniversary. Robin had been under his doctors’ care. He had been struggling with symptoms that seemed unrelated: constipation, urinary difficulty, heartburn, sleeplessness and insomnia, and a poor sense of smell—and lots of stress. He also had a slight tremor in his left hand that would come and go. For the time being, that was attributed to a previous shoulder injury.

On this particular weekend, he started having gut discomfort. Having been by my husband’s side for many years already, I knew his normal reactions when it came to fear and anxiety. What would follow was markedly out of character for him. His fear and anxiety skyrocketed to a point that was alarming. I wondered privately, Is my husband a hypochondriac? Not until after Robin left us would I discover that a sudden and prolonged spike in fear and anxiety can be an early indication of LBD.

He was tested for diverticulitis and the results were negative. Like the rest of the symptoms that followed, they seemed to come and go at random times. Some symptoms were more prevalent than others, but these increased in frequency and severity over the next 10 months.

By wintertime, problems with paranoia, delusions and looping, insomnia, memory, and high cortisol levels—just to name a few—were settling in hard. Psychotherapy and other medical help was becoming a constant in trying to manage and solve these seemingly disparate conditions.

I was getting accustomed to the two of us spending more time in reviewing our days. The subjects though were starting to fall predominantly in the category of fear and anxiety. These concerns that used to have a normal range of tenor were beginning to lodge at a high frequency for him. Once the coroner’s report was reviewed, a doctor was able to point out to me that there was a high concentration of Lewy bodies within the amygdala. This likely caused the acute paranoia and out-of-character emotional responses he was having. How I wish he could have known why he was struggling, that it was not a weakness in his heart, spirit, or character.

In early April, Robin had a panic attack. He was in Vancouver, filming Night at the Museum 3. His doctor recommended an antipsychotic medication to help with the anxiety. It seemed to make things better in some ways, but far worse in others. Quickly we searched for something else. Not until after he left us would I discover that antipsychotic medications often make things worse for people with LBD. Also, Robin had a high sensitivity to medications and sometimes his reactions were unpredictable. This is apparently a common theme in people with LBD.

During the filming of the movie, Robin was having trouble remembering even one line for his scenes, while just 3 years prior he had played in a full 5-month season of the Broadway production Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo, often doing two shows a day with hundreds of lines—and not one mistake. This loss of memory and inability to control his anxiety was devastating to him.

While I was on a photo shoot at Phoenix Lake, capturing scenes to paint, he called several times. He was very concerned with insecurities he was having about himself and interactions with others. We went over every detail. The fears were unfounded and I could not convince him otherwise. I was powerless in helping him see his own brilliance.

For the first time, my own reasoning had no effect in helping my husband find the light through the tunnels of his fear. I felt his disbelief in the truths I was saying. My heart and my hope were shattered temporarily. We had reached a place we had never been before. My husband was trapped in the twisted architecture of his neurons and no matter what I did I could not pull him out.

In early May, the movie wrapped and he came home from Vancouver—like a 747 airplane coming in with no landing gear. I have since learned that people with LBD who are highly intelligent may appear to be okay for longer initially, but then, it is as though the dam suddenly breaks and they cannot hold it back anymore. In Robin’s case, on top of being a genius, he was a Julliard-trained actor. I will never know the true depth of his suffering, nor just how hard he was fighting. But from where I stood, I saw the bravest man in the world playing the hardest role of his life.

Robin was losing his mind and he was aware of it. Can you imagine the pain he felt as he experienced himself disintegrating? And not from something he would ever know the name of, or understand? Neither he, nor anyone could stop it—no amount of intelligence or love could hold it back.

Powerless and frozen, I stood in the darkness of not knowing what was happening to my husband. Was it a single source, a single terrorist, or was this a combo pack of disease raining down on him?

He kept saying, “I just want to reboot my brain.” Doctor appointments, testing, and psychiatry kept us in perpetual motion. Countless blood tests, urine tests, plus rechecks of cortisol levels and lymph nodes. A brain scan was done, looking for a possible tumor on his pituitary gland, and his cardiologist rechecked his heart. Everything came back negative, except for high cortisol levels. We wanted to be happy about all the negative test results, but Robin and I both had a deep sense that something was terribly wrong.

On May 28th, he was diagnosed with Parkinson disease (PD).

We had an answer. My heart swelled with hope. But somehow I knew Robin was not buying it.

When we were in the neurologist’s office learning exactly what this meant, Robin had a chance to ask some burning questions. He asked, “Do I have Alzheimer’s? Dementia? Am I schizophrenic?” The answers were the best we could have gotten: No, no, and no. There were no indications of these other diseases. It is apparent to me now that he was most likely keeping the depth of his symptoms to himself.

Robin continued doing all the right things—therapy, physical therapy, bike riding, and working out with his trainer. He used all the skills he picked up and had fine-tuned from the Dan Anderson retreat in Minnesota, like deeper 12-step work, meditation, and yoga. We went to see a specialist at Stanford University who taught him self-hypnosis techniques to quell the irrational fears and anxiety. Nothing seemed to alleviate his symptoms for long.

Throughout all of this, Robin was clean and sober, and somehow, we sprinkled those summer months with happiness, joy, and the simple things we loved: meals and birthday celebrations with family and friends, meditating together, massages, and movies, but mostly just holding each other’s hand.

Robin was growing weary. The parkinsonian mask was ever present and his voice was weakened. His left hand tremor was continuous now and he had a slow, shuffling gait. He hated that he could not find the words he wanted in conversations. He would thrash at night and still had terrible insomnia. At times, he would find himself stuck in a frozen stance, unable to move, and frustrated when he came out of it. He was beginning to have trouble with visual and spatial abilities in the way of judging distance and depth. His loss of basic reasoning just added to his growing confusion.

It felt like he was drowning in his symptoms, and I was drowning along with him. Typically the plethora of LBD symptoms appear and disappear at random times—even throughout the course of a day. I experienced my brilliant husband being lucid with clear reasoning 1 minute and then, 5 minutes later, blank, lost in confusion.

Prior history can also complicate a diagnosis. In Robin’s case, he had a history of depression that had not been active for 6 years. So when he showed signs of depression just months before he left, it was interpreted as a satellite issue, maybe connected to PD.

Throughout the course of Robin’s battle, he had experienced nearly all of the 40-plus symptoms of LBD, except for one. He never said he had hallucinations.

A year after he left, in speaking with one of the doctors who reviewed his records, it became evident that most likely he did have hallucinations, but was keeping that to himself.

It was nearing the end of July and we were told Robin would need to have inpatient neurocognitive testing done in order to evaluate the mood disorder aspect of his condition. In the meantime, his medication was switched from Mirapex to Sinemet in an effort to reduce symptoms. We were assured Robin would be feeling better soon, and that his PD was early and mild. We felt hopeful again. What we did not know was that when these diseases “start” (are diagnosed) they have actually been going on for a long time.

By now, our combined sleep deficit was becoming a danger to both of us. We were instructed to sleep apart until we could catch up on our sleep. The goal was to have him begin inpatient testing free of the sleep-deprived state he was in.

As the second weekend in August approached, it seemed his delusional looping was calming down. Maybe the switch in medications was working. We did all the things we love on Saturday day and into the evening, it was perfect—like one long date. By the end of Sunday, I was feeling that he was getting better.

When we retired for sleep, in our customary way, my husband said to me, “Goodnight, my love,” and waited for my familiar reply: “Goodnight, my love.”

His words still echo through my heart today.

Monday, August 11, Robin was gone.

After Robin left, time has never functioned the same for me. My search for meaning has replicated like an inescapable spring throughout nearly every aspect of my world, including the most mundane.

Robin and I had begun our unplanned research on the brain through the door of blind experience. During the final months we shared together, our sights were locked fast on identifying and vanquishing the terrorist within his brain. Since then, I have continued our research but on the other side of that experience, in the realm of the science behind it.

Three months after Robin’s death, the autopsy report was finally ready for review. When the forensic pathologist and coroner’s deputy asked if I was surprised by the diffuse LBD pathology, I said, “Absolutely not,” even though I had no idea what it meant at the time. The mere fact that something had invaded nearly every region of my husband’s brain made perfect sense to me.

In the year that followed, I set out to expand my view and understanding of LBD. I met with medical professionals who had reviewed Robin’s last 2 years of medical records, the coroner’s report, and brain scans. Their reactions were all the same: that Robin’s was one of the worst LBD pathologies they had seen and that there was nothing else anyone could have done. Our entire medical team was on the right track and we would have gotten there eventually. In fact, we were probably close.

But would having a diagnosis while he was alive really have made a difference when there is no cure? We will never know the answer to this. I am not convinced that the knowledge would have done much more than prolong Robin’s agony while he would surely become one of the most famous test subjects of new medicines and ongoing medical trials. Even if we experienced some level of comfort in knowing the name, and fleeting hope from temporary comfort with medications, the terrorist was still going to kill him. There is no cure and Robin’s steep and rapid decline was assured.

The massive proliferation of Lewy bodies throughout his brain had done so much damage to neurons and neurotransmitters that in effect, you could say he had chemical warfare in his brain.

One professional stated, “It was as if he had cancer throughout every organ of his body.” The key problem seemed to be that no one could correctly interpret Robin’s symptoms in time.

I was driven to learn everything I could about this disease that I finally had the name of. Some of what I learned surprised me.

One neuropathologist described LBD and PD as being at opposite ends of a disease spectrum. That spectrum is based on something they share in common: the presence of Lewy bodies—the unnatural clumping of the normal protein, α-synuclein, within brain neurons. I was also surprised to learn that a person is diagnosed with LBD vs PD depending on which symptoms present first.

After months and months, I was finally able to be specific about Robin’s disease. Clinically he had PD, but pathologically he had diffuse LBD. The predominant symptoms Robin had were not physical—the pathology more than backed that up. However you look at it—the presence of Lewy bodies took his life.

The journey Robin and I were on together has led me to knowing the American Academy of Neurology and other groups and doctors. It has led me to discover the American Brain Foundation, where I now serve on the Board of Directors.

This is where you come into the story.

Hopefully from this sharing of our experience you will be inspired to turn Robin’s suffering into something meaningful through your work and wisdom. It is my belief that when healing comes out of Robin’s experience, he will not have battled and died in vain. You are uniquely positioned to help with this.

I know you have accomplished much already in the areas of research and discovery toward cures in brain disease. And I am sure at times the progress has felt painfully slow. Do not give up. Trust that a cascade of cures and discovery is imminent in all areas of brain disease and you will be a part of making that happen.

If only Robin could have met you. He would have loved you—not just because he was a genius and enjoyed science and discovery, but because he would have found a lot of material within your work to use in entertaining his audiences, including the troops. In fact, the most repeat character role he played throughout his career was a doctor, albeit different forms of practice.

You and your work have ignited a spark within the region of my brain where curiosity and interest lie and within my heart where hope lives. I want to follow you. Not like a crazed fan, but like someone who knows you just might be the one who discovers the cure for LBD and other brain diseases.

Thank you for what you have done, and for what you are about to do.

DISCLOSURE

Susan Schneider Williams serves on the Board of Directors for the American Brain Foundation (americanbrainfoundation.org) but reports no disclosures relevant to the manuscript.

Go to Neurology.org for full disclosures.

Recognising Diagnosing Misdiagnosing Lewy Body Dementia: The Doctor’s Perspective

Lewy Body Dementia
Lewy Body Dementia UK

Lewy Body Dementia is often mistaken for other forms of dementia.

Below we post a detailed report and perspective from a qualified doctor Charles E. Driscoll, MD.

Frequently misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body dementia is notable for its up-and-down swings that precede the eventual decline.

As a family physician/geriatrician, I sometimes speak to primary care physicians about dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) because of the understanding my spouse and I have gained while caring for our family members during their personal walk with LB disease.

I once asked an audience of 400 primary care providers who among them was currently caring for a patient with DLB. Fewer than a dozen hands went up.

After my presentation, when I called for another show of hands, most in the room realized they probably had been caring for a patient with DLB under the assumption that it was another type of dementia.

If your first reaction to DLB is “never heard of it,” you’re not alone, as the disorder was not consistently recognized until 1996 and not listed in the International Classification of Diseases until 2005. This article addresses the key points of what we have learned and information that will help in the care of these patients.

What Defines LBD?
Lewy body dementia (LBD) describes two distinct but related types of dementia: DLB and Parkinson’s disease with dementia (PDD). LBD is now recognized as the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease (AD), affecting more than 1.5 million people and their families and accounting for 20% to 25% of all dementias.1

Mental dysfunction is caused by neurodegeneration accompanied by the cerebral deposition of an abnormal protein called alpha-synuclein as compared with AD, which is associated with the protein beta-amyloid with neurofibrillary tangles.

Unlike AD, which mainly affects the cerebral cortex, LBD can affect the cortex and substantia nigra, altering both cognitive and motor functions. If dementia appears first, followed by or concurrent with PD motor symptoms, it is usually referred to as DLB, but if motor dysfunction presents initially with dementia occurring more than one year later, it is diagnosed as PDD.2

The current consensus is that these neurodegenerative conditions, along with other LB conditions (eg, multiple system atrophy, LB variant of Alzheimer’s, Down syndrome, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, dementia with brain iron accumulation), are all part of a spectrum of disorders. Experts are still struggling to establish agreement on the taxonomy.

Establishing the Diagnosis
LBD is frequently initially misdiagnosed as AD in its earlier stages until the defining characteristics begin to appear. Unlike the gradual, steady decline of AD, LBD is notable for its up-and-down swings before eventual decline. Some family members initially are confused about what they are observing because their family member can function apparently normally one day and exhibit dramatic symptoms the next.

The key to appropriate LBD management is earlier recognition. Several consequences of misdiagnosing this condition include exposing the patient to potentially harmful medications (eg, exaggerated response to benzodiazepines and neuroleptic drugs), missing an opportunity to choose effective therapies (eg, better response to cholinesterase inhibitors), and delaying the opportunity to help families understand and cope with the significant burden of this illness.

Here are clues that the dementia you are observing is LBD. Unlike early AD, LBD often begins with episodic loss of long-term memory and more marked impairments of executive (eg, making decisions; sequential tasking), visuo-spatial, and attentive functions. People with LBD also show more problems with impulse control and behavior. Research has concluded that LBD patients exhibit a higher rate of periodic limb movements and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder that can help to differentiate DLB from AD.3,4

A diagnosis of LBD requires some combination of dementia and the following2:

• three core symptoms: fluctuating cognition (bad days and good “showtime” days), vivid visual hallucinations and/or delusions, and motor dysfunction; or

• three suggestive symptoms: REM sleep behavior disorder with acting out of dreams or excessive daytime sleepiness, abnormal brain CT/MRI, and extreme sensitivity to haloperidol and tranquilizers.

DLB is considered probable with the presence of dementia plus two core symptoms or one core and one or more suggestive symptoms. It is considered possible with dementia plus one core symptom or one or more suggestive symptoms.

A histological diagnosis can be made at autopsy with the findings of alpha-synuclein–positive Lewy bodies extensively distributed within the neocortical and limbic areas (see Figure 1 below). Unfortunately, there is no accurate premortem test that will nail down the LB diagnosis. At this time, there is research in the use of imaging techniques to aid in the diagnosis.

Single photon emission CT testing has identified an association with occipital hypoperfusion. MRIs have shown DLB-specific changes, including preservation of hippocampal and medial temporal lobe volumes, compared with AD. Recently, presynaptic dopaminergic deficits in the striatum have been visualized using a 123I-radiolabeled marker (DaTSCAN). These techniques are still in the realm of research institutions and not widely available.

Typical Disease Progression
LBD generally is thought to progress to death faster than AD. Some authorities quote a prognosis of between two and seven years after onset until death. Men are more likely to die sooner than women. There also is a shorter course to nursing home placement for DLB patients than for those with AD. DLB patients are higher utilizers of emergency department and outpatient care, community services, and drug therapies.2

The disease evokes many emotions and a great deal of misunderstanding for families. Remembering that all forms of dementia are terminal, note that DLB patients qualify for hospice care to assist in the management of their various symptoms. Early referral often is helpful for families providing care at home. Additionally, referral to a family support group can be beneficial. The best information can be accessed from the Lewy Body Dementia Association (www.lbda.org).

Helpful Medications
The mainstay of LBD therapy is cholinesterase inhibitors (eg, donepezil, galantamine), which work better for the cognitive and behavioral symptoms of patients with DLB than those with AD. If the side effects experienced with one inhibitor are troublesome, another may be tried and may work better. If patients experience difficulty taking pills, a patch formulation (rivastigmine) is available. When a patient takes a cholinesterase inhibitor, the reduction in hallucinations and delusions can be remarkable.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can be useful for some patients with depression and anxiety, but the required dosages are smaller than those used for non-DLB patients. Disruptive behaviors (eg, aggression, wandering, hallucinations, delusions) are common in DLB and are frequently the precipitating event for a visit to a physician. Because behaviors are similar to those seen with delirium, the first step in dealing with them should be the elimination of organic causes.

Examining for a urinary tract infection, constipation with impaction, and occult infections is always justified. When families insist on pharmacological management, the atypical class of antipsychotics (eg, quetiapine) provide better management of disruptive behaviors because at least one-half of LBD patients are particularly sensitive to traditional antipsychotics and benzodiazepines. Fatal neuroleptic malignant syndrome with fever, restlessness, rigidity, and muscle cell breakdown has resulted from the use of haloperidol.

A higher prevalence of cardiovascular problems and abnormal electrical activity evident on an electrocardiogram (ECG) is more common in DLB patients. Because many medications can produce cardiotoxic effects, a black box warning has been placed on the atypical antipsychotics. An ECG should be performed to look for evidence of prolonged Q-T interval or some other conduction defect. This requires a careful explanation to ensure informed consent and agreement about the risks4 in the event of drug use.

The use of benzodiazepines or narcoleptic medications will often produce a paradoxical response in DLB, and this can be an early supportive clue to the diagnosis. DLB patients also tend to have more autonomic dysfunction than AD patients, and polypharmacy may result from attempts to control hypotension, constipation, urinary retention, myotonia, and excessive salivation as separate issues rather than as a part of the whole.

Many DLB patients will manifest the motor symptoms of Parkinsonism, but unfortunately anti-Parkinson drugs often make the cognitive and behavioral problems worse and thereby force a choice between the lesser of two evils. If simultaneous treatment is to be attempted, the dictum of “start very low and go very slow” certainly applies to patients with DLB.

Where Do We Go From Here?
DLB is underrecognized by physicians, and among the general public there is a very limited awareness of the different types of dementia. For years everything was labeled as AD, with little reason to do otherwise, since physicians’ knowledge base precluded any effective management. Now there are good reasons to discriminate these conditions—and the earlier the better.

DLB is far more apt to overstress and burden families.5 In facilitating a support group, my wife and I have found that getting people to share their experiences makes them realize the commonality of the bizarre symptoms they see in their loved ones and normalizes the experience so that they feel better able to try new coping skills at home. Grieving is common in DLB families, even long before the death occurs, and a support group provides recognition of this fact and significant comfort.

Many caregivers are themselves aged spouses or siblings and are themselves experiencing the onset of personal health issues. They need to be reminded to keep their own doctors’ appointments and be spiritually nurtured in order to remain strong in caregiving. Getting adequate and early assistance for family caregivers helps reduce the strain of caring for someone with dementia.

Managing patients with DLB is a difficult and sometimes frustrating task for physicians. Teamwork by office members will help to spread out the busyness of communication with families, medication management, and coordination of community services. The literature about DLB is sometimes hard to find and in a variety of journals. Monitoring the information for physicians on the Lewy Body Disease Association website is a good way to identify new advances in the science and resources that may be useful in patient care.

— Charles E. Driscoll, MD, is a clinical professor of family medicine at the University of Virginia and a clinical associate professor of family medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. He is board certified in family medicine and geriatrics with special interest in dementia and frailty in the elderly.

— Jean Driscoll, MS, along with her husband, established the first Lewy Body support group for families in Virginia. Together they serve as the group’s facilitators.

Resources for Patients
• A Caregiver’s Guide to Lewy Body Dementia by Helen Buell Whitworth and Jim Whitworth: This book is a comprehensive guide to all things Lewy body. The Whitworths also write a blog, The Lewy Body Rollercoaster, which answers questions, references other sources, and announces new developments (http://lbdtools.com). Jim Whitworth is a cofounder of the Lewy Body Dementia Association.

• A Long Dark Night — A Caregiver’s Journey With Dementia by Philip Edward Phlegar Weeks: Weeks is an Episcopal bishop who, in this book, explains his feelings and frustrations with the Lewy body dementia affecting his spouse. He addresses spirituality, sexuality, and the difficulty of getting community services coordinated.

• Creating Moments of Joy for the Person With Alzheimer’s or Dementia: A Journal for Caregivers by Jolene Brackey: The fourth edition of this work by Brackey, an activities director in a memory care unit, includes practical solutions and strategies for caregivers wrapped in humor, warmth, and a message of hope.

• Learning to Speak Alzheimer’s: A Groundbreaking Approach for Everyone Dealing With the Disease by Joanne Koenig Coste: Coste is a nationally recognized expert in communications techniques. After her experience with a spouse who had Alzheimer’s, she offers her five basic tenets for use by caregivers and provides hundreds of practical tips.

• Living With Lewy’s: Empowering Today’s Dementia Caregiver by Amy and Gerald Throop: The authors’ decade of caregiving experience provides the basis for this book. It was written to provide a better understanding of the dementia process and to share practical, safe methods of dealing with specific disabilities and behaviors.

Lewy Body Dementia: Who is vulnerable? Who is at risk of LBD?

Lewy Body Dementia

Many people message this blog for answers to the question: am i at risk?

Below we post a list of risk factors that (could) be relevant.

A risk factor is something that could increase the chance of developing a disease.

Some examples of risk factors for cancer are age, a family history of certain cancers, use of tobacco products, being exposed to radiation or certain chemicals, infection with certain viruses or bacteria, and certain genetic changes.

But, risk factors can also be seen as characteristics at the biological, psychological, family, community, or
cultural level that precede and are associated with a higher likelihood of negative outcomes.

Until recently, the only known risk factor for developing Lewy body dementia was considered to be an older age.

Research has made some gains lately in sifting out what might increase the risk of developing Lewy body dementia.

As people age, they generally have a greater risk of developing Lewy body dementia.

The typical age range for the development of Lewy body dementia is between 50 and 85, although it can occur outside those ages.

In one study, researchers found that the peak age range for Lewy body dementia to develop is between 70-79.

Not Smoking

Interestingly, people with a history of smoking cigarettes have a lower risk of developing Lewy body dementia.2 However, the negative health effects of smoking are such that this is never recommended as a way to prevent Lewy body dementia.

Low Education Levels

More years of education are correlated with a reduced risk of Lewy body dementia.2

Depression and Anxiety

A history of depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing Lewy body dementia.2

Less Caffeine Intake

A history of higher caffeine consumption is associated with a lower risk of Lewy body dementia.2 Caffeine intake has also been correlated with a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Family History

About 10% of Lewy body dementia cases appear to be tied to heredity, where the person inherits the disease from a parent. When someone has had Lewy body dementia or Parkinson’s disease, his or her family members have a higher risk of developing Lewy body dementia.2 These familial cases of Lewy body dementia appear to occur often in younger people.

Mutations in genes known as SNCA and SNCB can cause Lewy body dementia. Some research has found that people with a variant of the GBA gene may have a higher risk of developing Lewy body dementia. Being positive for the APOE 4 gene was also found to be higher in those who developed Lewy body dementia. APOE ε4 has been tied to a significantly higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease.3

ADHD

According to one study published in the European Journal of Neurology, almost half of the participants in the study had adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), compared to only 15% of those with Alzheimer’s disease.4

Gender

Men have a higher chance of developing Lewy body dementia than women do. Approximately twice as many males as females develop Lewy body dementia.1

Stroke

One study found that a prior stroke was correlated with an increased risk of Lewy body dementia.5

Hypertension

High blood pressure has been correlated with a higher risk or both Alzheimer’s disease and Lewy body dementia.5

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus, specifically type 2, has been strongly associated with a higher occurrence of Alzheimer’s disease, so much so that Alzheimer’s is sometimes referred to as “type 3 diabetes.” Other research has also determined that diabetes carries a higher risk of Lewy body dementia.5

Hyperlipidemia

Hyperlipidemia, commonly referred to as high cholesterol levels, also increases the risk of both Alzheimer’s disease and Lewy body dementia.5 High cholesterol levels are connected with cardiovascular diseases, which have been tied to increased dementia risk.

Oophorectomy History

One other factor identified as being connected with a higher risk of developing Lewy body dementia is a history of an oophorectomy, which is the removal of one or both of the ovaries in women.2

Can You Prevent Lewy Body Dementia?

If you have a family history of Lewy body dementia or Parkinson’s disease, it’s understandable to be concerned about developing Lewy body dementia.

Like other types of dementia, there’s not a guaranteed way to completely prevent Lewy body dementia.

However, understanding the factors that increase the risk helps us identify opposing strategies that can decrease this likelihood, and these strategies are generally connected with better physical health, as well.

Fascinating History Insight Observation Lewy Body Dementia

Lewy Body Dementia
Lewy Body Dementia

When dealing with, and trying to understand Lewy Body Dementia, it always helps if we can draw upon many different sources and experiences.

Below we have dug up a fascinating insight from times gone by, but nevertheless a very important piece of history concerning Lewy Body Dementia.

We think you will find this very informative and fascinating, as did we.

With many thanks to Jama Network

Mervyn Peake

Mervyn Peake (1911-1968) was an accomplished British artist, poet, novelist, and playwright. He was a prolific and talented illustrator and wrote hundreds of poems, 4 novels, and several plays.

His exceptional career was prematurely ended by a neurodegenerative illness variously ascribed to Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, or postencephalitic parkinsonism.

However, a detailed review of biographical accounts produces substantial evidence in support of a probable diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies, a clinical entity remaining undiagnosed outside specialty dementia clinics.

Peake developed signs of parkinsonism and insidious cognitive decline during his fifth decade. A breakdown in his writing style has frequently been cited as reflecting his encroaching dementia.

Visual hallucinations are portrayed in sketches, and together with paranoid delusions are apparent in poetry composed during his illness.

His deterioration was progressive and punctuated by well-described episodes of confusion and psychosis.

His occasional preservation of insight is poignantly captured in drawings of figures with dunce caps or pointed heads, often with expressions of fear and apprehension etched with an economy of strokes.

Peake spent his final years in various psychiatric institutions but continued to exhibit lucid intervals even late into his illness.

His tragic deterioration remained undiagnosed at the time, but in retrospect, his progressive dementia with parkinsonism, visual hallucinations, and marked cognitive fluctuations likely represents one of the earliest recognized historical cases of dementia with Lewy bodies.

Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is estimated to account for 15% to 20% of cases of dementia, based on autopsy data1 and epidemiologic studies.2 Wider recognition of this disorder has emerged only recently, coinciding with descriptions published since the 1980s.3 To date, reports of prominent historical cases are lacking, although with increasing awareness, such cases are more likely to be recognized in retrospect.

A probable diagnosis is apparent in the neurobehavioral deterioration of accomplished British artist, poet, novelist, and playwright, Mervyn Peake (1911-1968), whose celebrated Gormenghast novels were recently adapted into a critically acclaimed television miniseries by the British Broadcasting Corporation.4 

Peake’s persistent attempts at artistic expression in the face of a relentless, cognitively devastating illness provide us with a unique and intensely personal account of a historical case of DLB.

Mervyn Peake was born in Kuling (Lushan), China, in 1911. His father, a British missionary physician, brought his family back to England in 1922. As a young man, Peake entered art school and first exhibited his work in 1931. He soon established a reputation as a talented illustrator. He was called up for military service in 1940, and while serving in the army, started work on his Gormenghast novels.

After the war, he was commissioned to document the aftermath of the conflict and completed a series of heartbreaking sketches of concentration camp survivors at Belsen. He continued to write and illustrate, producing many of his finest paintings, drawings, and poems during the late 1940s (Figure 1). He was much admired as an art instructor, and during this period also scripted several plays.5

These examples are taken from some of Mervyn Peake's earlier work, prior to the onset of cognitive decline. A, Self-portrait. Oil on canvas (National Portrait Gallery, London). B, Illustration for a 1949 edition of Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island. Published with permission from the Mervyn Peake estate.

These examples are taken from some of Mervyn Peake’s earlier work, prior to the onset of cognitive decline. A, Self-portrait. Oil on canvas (National Portrait Gallery, London). B, Illustration for a 1949 edition of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island. Published with permission from the Mervyn Peake estate.

Peake first showed signs of a mysterious neurodegenerative illness around 1956, developing signs of parkinsonism and symptoms of cognitive decline in his fifth decade.5 Perplexed biographers have alternately speculated diagnoses of Alzheimer disease,6 Parkinson disease,7 or postencephalitic parkinsonism5 after questioning a history of viral encephalitis6 or encephalitis lethargica.5 

The disintegration of Peake’s writing style has frequently been regarded as reflective of his encroaching dementia.7 He also suffered from bouts of depression, which influenced his later work. After a stressful period that culminated with a number of disastrous play reviews, his behavior started to become erratic, and his wife reported that he experienced hallucinations.8 

His deterioration was progressive, punctuated by well-described episodes of confusion and psychosis but relieved by intermittent lucid periods. He was ultimately diagnosed as having parkinsonism and “premature senility.”8

In 1960, neurosurgical approaches for Parkinson disease were being attempted, and Peake underwent one of these procedures in an effort to ameliorate his parkinsonian symptoms. The effects were disappointing.

As a last resort, an appointment was arranged with the preeminent British neurologist of the day, Sir Russel Brain, but he was likewise unable to assist the ailing artist. Peake spent the next several years of his life in various institutions, treated with neuroleptics and electroconvulsive therapy, until his death in 1968 at the age of 57 years.8 

His work has since drawn substantial critical acclaim and is presently the subject of increasing public interest. His influence on subsequent generations of artists and writers has been profound.

Dementia with lewy bodies

In 1912, Friederich Lewy described the presence of intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra in patients with Parkinson disease.9 Lewy bodies in the midbrain are spherical, eosinophilic inclusions, differing slightly in appearance from those described in the neocortex.

Reports of cortical Lewy bodies were rare until new staining techniques for ubiquitin were introduced in the 1970s. The occurrence of cortical Lewy bodies in cases of dementia was firmly established by the 1980s.3 Antibodies to α-synuclein, which immunostain Lewy bodies, have since replaced the use of the ubiquitin stain, and DLB is now classified among the spectrum of diseases regarded as synucleinopathies.10

Consensus criteria for the diagnosis of DLB were published in 1996 and refined in 1999 (Table 1).11,12 The prospective sensitivity and specificity of the consensus criteria for DLB are reported at 0.83 and 0.95, respectively.13 Previous retrospective studies yielded comparable specificities (0.87-1.00) but lower sensitivities (0.22-0.89).14 

Hence, although the criteria might not identify every individual harboring the condition, there is high certainty of a diagnosis of DLB if the criteria are met.

Age at onset generally ranges from 50 to 83 years,15 although autopsy-verified cases have been documented in patients with initial symptoms at an age as young as 27 and 33 years.16 The mean survival time is usually comparable with that of Alzheimer disease.15

Consensus Criteria for a Diagnosis of Dementia With Lewy Bodies (DLB)11,12

Consensus Criteria for a Diagnosis of Dementia With Lewy Bodies (DLB)

Historical evidence

Peake’s progressive cognitive decline is apparent in his later work. His pronounced difficulties with attention and visuospatial ability are typical of DLB, in contrast with the more prominent decline in memory function observed in Alzheimer disease.11 Commencing with his later illustrations, one biographer observed that, “there is a coarseness of feeling, a lack of sympathy for the persons he portrays.”8

By 1958, his drawings were more caricaturelike and later became “geometric and then almost abstract”8(p219) in keeping with Peake’s inexorable deterioration of visuospatial function. In this respect, his case is comparable with those of Willem de Kooning17 and William Utermohlen,18 in whom similar changes were noted in artistic ability with advancement of probable Alzheimer disease, likely arising from involvement of posterior isocortical association areas, with resultant deterioration of visuospatial function.

Although problems with memory were apparent by 1960, Peake’s “attention span had become so short that he could no longer read a story and retain the idea for an illustration long enough to draw it.”8(p223)

Thus, both cognitive domains predominantly affected in DLB were especially involved. Conversely, a tenuous preservation of insight was captured in drawings of figures in dunce caps or with pointed heads, often with expressions of fear and apprehension etched with an economy of strokes (Figure 2A), distinguishing him from artists diagnosed as having probable Alzheimer disease.18

Sketches by Mervyn Peake made late in the course of his dementia. A, Figure with dunce cap, a repetitive theme. B, Animal-like floating creatures surround a tormented individual, drawn while Peake was suffering from visual hallucinations. Published with permission from the Mervyn Peake estate.

Sketches by Mervyn Peake made late in the course of his dementia. A, Figure with dunce cap, a repetitive theme. B, Animal-like floating creatures surround a tormented individual, drawn while Peake was suffering from visual hallucinations. Published with permission from the Mervyn Peake estate.

Peake’s parkinsonian signs and symptoms have been well documented in biographies.8 In his mid 40s, he developed shaking of the hands and was tentatively diagnosed as having Parkinson disease after evaluation at the National Hospital, Queen’s Square (London, England).5 

The shaking “spread to his legs as well as his hands” and exhibited “remorseless progression” over the years.8(p213) The beneficial effects of L-dopa in the management of Parkinson disease were not discovered until the 1960s, and so treatment in the preceding decade was limited to the use of anticholinergic medications and experimental surgical pallidotomy. Later photographs of Peake reveal the stooped posture and inscrutable expression characteristic of parkinsonism.

Peake was tormented by recurring visual hallucinations, the early development of which—soon after the onset of his other symptoms—is further suggestive of DLB. Many well-formed and detailed examples are evident in his sketches (Figure 2B). These hallucinations, together with the paranoid delusions he experienced while in the hospital, were incorporated into poetry composed during his institutionalization:

Other poems, perhaps indicating auditory as well as visual hallucinations, and letters to his wife reflecting his frightening delusions, are further discussed in a recent biography.5

By the time he entered his sixth decade, Peake “was with us only in flashes, and those flashes were often over before we had grasped what he had said, or could reply. Most of the time he sat in silence, head bowed.”20(p37) A remarkable example of the striking fluctuation in his mental status follows:

After dinner he was sitting humped on the sofa when suddenly he made a motion towards Maeve, and as she leaned over him he indicated that he wanted some paper and something to draw with. My wife produced a sheaf of quarto typing paper and placed a ball-point pen in his swollen hand. We went on talking while he sat with the sheaf of white paper on his knee. . . . Then I noticed that his hand had ceased its normal shaking, and that he was sitting upright with the paper held firmly, concentrating. For more than an hour, he seemed to lose touch with his illness altogether. He covered page after page with wonderful and preposterous beasts, leaping, snarling, laughing, cavorting. As soon as one was finished he turned to a fresh page and drew another. We self-consciously kept up our conversation, although all three of us were watching him in amazement. He appeared unaware of our presence. And then the spell was broken. He dropped the pen, and his hand began to shake again.”20(pp37-38)

This is a compelling description of a dramatic fluctuation in cognition and alertness, which is typical of DLB and not other forms of dementia, such as Alzheimer disease. There are abundant examples of similar observations in accounts of his illness.5,7,8

Several features supportive of a diagnosis of DLB are also apparent in biographical material of Peake’s neurobehavioral decline. Repeated falls were observed, as “his sense of balance would suddenly desert him, and he would lurch and fall against objects and people.”21(p204) Moreover, there is frequent reference to neuroleptic sensitivity, since “although the doctors gave him tranquilizers, the tremors in his hands and legs increased.”8(p218)

Thorazine and chlorpromazine were the most common neuroleptics used in the 1950s and 1960s. His wife often ironically observed that the medications doctors gave him only seemed to make him worse.8 One of his physicians also noted that some of the treatments “aggravated the parkinsonism, rather than improved it.”21 Worsening confusion and exacerbation of parkinsonism are common consequences of neuroleptic use in DLB.12,15

Peake’s symptoms developed at a younger age than most patients with DLB, although the duration of his illness was more in keeping with the diagnosis. Throughout his institutionalization, he was victim to systematized delusions and hallucinations.

His occasional bouts of depression intensified over time. In addition, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder may have been present, since Peake was plagued by nightmares and “a restless nervous energy that prevented him from sleeping at night.”8(p212) However, the published material does not allow for verification of this possibility.

Previous speculation has centered on the possibility that Peake suffered from postencephalitic parkinsonism,21 but such an explanation is dubious on several counts. The pandemic of von Economo encephalitis (encephalitis lethargica, or “sleeping sickness”), which was first described in 1916 and dwindled to obscurity by 1929, was associated with a syndrome of parkinsonism observed to manifest up to 4 or 5 years after the acute illness.

There is no reliable record of acute encephalitis in Peake, and by the 1940s, cases of postencephalitic parkinsonism had become exceedingly rare.22 Moreover, no instances of oculogyric crises or convulsive movements, dramatic features typical of postencephalitic parkinsonism, were ever reported to occur in Peake. Finally, progressive dementia was not a prominent part of the clinical picture in the postencephalitic syndrome, which was generally limited to chronic parkinsonian phenomena.22

Mervyn Peake’s deterioration was a mystery at the time, but in retrospect, his progressive neurobehavioral decline associated with parkinsonism, visual hallucinations, and cognitive fluctuations likely represents one of the earliest recognizable, and possibly best-documented, historical cases of DLB. There is abundant biographical evidence that he exhibited all of the core features (only 2 of which are required for a probable diagnosis of DLB), as well as most of the ancillary features supportive of the diagnosis.

The burgeoning popularity of Peake’s work serves as a testament to his brilliant expressions of imagination. That such a gifted artist succumbed to a dementing illness with a predilection for attention and visuospatial function is particularly tragic.

His later work stands as a unique and defiant record of his struggle with the disease. Recognition of the likely cause of his affliction as his popularity continues to grow may ultimately serve to heighten awareness of this distinct and devastating form of dementia.Article Information

Corresponding author and reprints: Demetrios J. Sahlas, MD, MSc, FRCP(C), Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave, A4 21, Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M5, Canada (e-mail: dj.sahlas@sw.ca).

Dr Sahlas is supported by a joint personnel award from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Ottawa, Ontario, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Ottawa.

I would like to thank Sebastian Peake, the artist’s son, and the Peake family for their interest as well as for their kind permission to reproduce the poetry and artwork contained herein.

The helpful staff at the Merril Collection, Toronto Public Library, is gratefully acknowledged. Special thanks are extended to Sandra E. Black, MD, for a critical review of the manuscript.References1.

Weiner MF Dementia associated with Lewy bodies.  Arch Neurol.1999;56:1441-1442.Google Scholar2.Holmes  CCairns  NLantos  P  et al Validity of current clinical criteria for Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies.  

Br J Psychiatry.1999;174:45-50.Google Scholar3.Kosaka  KYoshimura  MIkeda  KBudka  H Diffuse type of Lewy body disease.  Clin Neuropathol.1984;3:185-192.Google Scholar4.Not Available Gormenghast [videotape].  London, England: British Broadcasting Corp; 2000.5.Yorke  M Mervyn Peake: My Eyes Mint Gold: A Life.  New York, NY: The Overlook Press; 2002:258-259, 286-289.6.Jones  L A reverie of bone.  New Worlds.1967;151:51-54.Google Scholar7.Batchelor  J Mervyn Peake: A Biographical and Critical Exploration. 

London, England: Gerald Duckworth & Co Ltd; 1974.8.Winnington  GP Vast Alchemies.  London, England: Peter Owen Publishers; 2000.9.Lewy  FH Paralysis agitans, I: pathologische anatomie.  In: Lewyandowsky  M, ed.  Hadbuch der Neurologie. Berlin, Germany: Springer; 1912:920-933.Google Scholar10.Galvin  JELee  VM-YTrojanowski  JQ Synucleinopathies.  Arch Neurol.2001;58:186-190.Google Scholar11.McKeith  IGGalasko  DKosaka  K  et al Consensus guidelines for the clinical and pathological diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB): report of the consortium on DLB international workshop.  

Neurology.1996;47:1113-1124.Google Scholar12.McKeith  IGPerry  EKPerry  RH Report on the second dementia with Lewy body international workshop: consortium on dementia with Lewy bodies.  Neurology.1999;53:902-905.Google Scholar13.McKeith  IGCalard  CGPerry  RH  et al Prospective validation of consensus criteria for the diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies.  Neurology.2000;54:1050-1058.Google Scholar14.McKeith  IGO’Brien  JTBallard  C Diagnosing dementia with Lewy bodies.  Lancet.1999;354:1227-1228.Google Scholar15.McKeith  IG Dementia with Lewy bodies.  

Br J Psychiatry.2002;180:144-147.Google Scholar16.Gibb  WRGEsiri  MMLees  AJ Clinical and pathological features of diffuse cortical Lewy body disease (Lewy body dementia).  Brain.1987;110:1131-1153.Google Scholar17.Espinel  CH de Kooning’s late colours and forms: dementia, creativity, and the healing power of art.  Lancet.1996;347:1096-1098.Google Scholar18.Crutch  SJIsaacs  RRossor  MN Some workmen can blame their tools: artistic change in an individual with Alzheimer’s disease.  Lancet.2001;357:2129-2133.Google Scholar19.

Peake  M A Reverie of Bone.  London, England: Bertram Rota; 1967.20.Mullins  E How many miles to Babylon?  Mervyn Peake Review.1985;19:37-81.Google Scholar21.Watney  J Mervyn Peake.  London, England: Michael Joseph; 1976.22.Dickman  MS von Economo encephalitis.  Arch Neurol.2001;58:1696-1698.Google Scholar

Signs Of LBD, Diagnosis Of Lewy Body Dementia, Plus Vaccine.

Lewy Body Dementia

Please see foot of this post below for info on research Lewy Body Dementia vaccine.

The word “dementia” describes a condition affecting a person’s memory and thinking that is a decline from how he or she used to function and that is severe enough to affect day-to-day life.

Alzheimer’s disease dementia and Lewy body dementia are the two most common types.

Lewy body dementia gets its name from the abnormal protein clumps that are seen on autopsies of the brains of people with Lewy body dementia.

The protein alpha-synuclein – a protein found in the brain, not one you eat – clumps into spheres called Lewy bodies which can be seen using a microscope.

These are named after F. H. Lewy, the person who first described them.

The diagnosis Lewy body dementia is an umbrella term that includes two different conditions: dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson’s disease dementia.

In dementia with Lewy bodies, a person develops memory and thinking problems before or at the same time as he or she develops movement problems that resemble Parkinson’s disease.

In Parkinson’s disease dementia, a person who has experienced Parkinson’s disease movement problems for years then also develops trouble with memory and thinking.

These two conditions share many of the same features.

In addition to memory and thinking problems and movement problems, people with these conditions can have fluctuations in their alertness and concentration, hallucinations and paranoia, acting out dreams during sleep (something called REM sleep behavior disorder), low blood pressure with standing, daytime sleepiness and depression, among other symptoms.

Diagnosis is important

Getting the correct diagnosis is critical for patients and families.

While no one wants to hear that they have a disease that currently can’t be cured, patients and families often feel relief that they finally have an explanation for what’s happening.

The diagnosis of Lewy body dementia is often missed due to lack of awareness by physicians, patients and families.

Even for people eventually receiving a diagnosis of Lewy body dementia, research shows their first diagnosis is commonly incorrect.

In that study, 26 percent of people later diagnosed with Lewy body dementia were first diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and 24 percent were given a psychiatric diagnosis like depression.

Knowing the correct diagnosis lets patients and families connect to resources such as the Lewy Body Dementia Association, an organization dedicated to helping people living with this disease.

The organization provides education on Lewy body dementia, helps patients and families know what to expect, links patients and families to support and resources and connects them to research opportunities.

Once a diagnosis is made, physicians can also suggest potentially helpful treatments.

Medications can include carbidopa/levodopa (Sinemet®), a drug that helps with slow movements, and cholinesterase inhibitors, which are drugs developed for Alzheimer’s disease that may also help people with Lewy body dementia.

Avenues for research

There is a great deal that we still need to learn about the Lewy body dementias.

Increasing research is a priority of the National Institutes of Health.

Earlier this year, experts published new criteria for the diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies, aiming to improve accurate diagnosis.

There are also currently multiple research studies trying to find drugs to help people with Lewy body dementias, including studies to investigate drugs hoped to improve thinkinghallucinations and walking.

For Parkinson’s disease dementia, a new drug called pimavanserin was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2016 to treat hallucinations. 

Vaccine Lewy Body Dementia

Current research studies are testing drugs hoped to improve memory and thinking.

Scientists also hope to learn more about the alpha-synuclein protein clumps in the Lewy body diseases.

Recent vaccine studies suggested that the body might be able to create antibodies against alpha-synuclein.

This could be the first step toward a vaccine to help people with Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

If effective, a vaccine would prompt the immune systems of people with these diseases to create antibodies to attack and clear the protein clumps.

With advances in diagnosis and treatment, there is reason for hope.

How To Manage Lewy Body Dementia Symptoms

Lewy Body Dementia UK

HOW TO MANAGE SYMPTOMS WITHOUT DRUGS

As carers we want to try and do as much as we can for our loved ones naturally, without using drugs.

Lewy body dementia is a complex disease that includes physical, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms.

The behavioral symptoms can be the most upsetting and difficult-to-manage parts of the disease. Hallucinations, delusions, aggression, agitation, apathy, depression, and anxiety are common.

Because antipsychotic drugs are especially dangerous for people with Lewy body and could make difficult symptoms even worse, it’s best to first try non-drug treatments before resorting to medication.

Non-drug treatments are also helpful in improving symptoms to potentially reduce medication dosage.

We share 10 non-drug ways to help manage and reduce the severity of Lewy body dementia symptoms.

These suggestions should only be used if the situation is safe. If anyone is in danger of physical harm, immediately get medical help.

1. Tolerate behavior that doesn’t cause harm, focus on reassurance and distraction
People with Lewy body dementia often experience hallucinations or delusions that cause strange behavior or false accusations.

But if their behavior isn’t aggressive or harmful, they don’t seem to have any physical pain or discomfort, and they’re not upset to an extreme degree, one solution is to tolerate the behavior and not try to convince them of our reality to stop the behavior.

Instead, respond to their emotions and concerns rather than the facts or exact words. Provide comfort as needed and assure them that they’re safe.

In these cases, the side effects of medication could be far worse than the hallucinations or delusions themselves.

2. Check for physical causes
Sometimes, new behavioral symptoms or a worsening of symptoms could be caused by physical pain or discomfort that the person isn’t able to verbally express or describe.

Common physical issues include severe arthritis, injury, fever, urinary tract infection (UTI)bed sores, and constipation. In some cases, simply being tired, needing to pee, or being hungry can also trigger negative behavior.

When physical pain is well treated, negative behavioral symptoms often decrease.

3. Check for medication side effects
Sometimes medications used to treat Lewy Body dementia symptoms or other common health conditions can increase behavioral problems.

For example, over-the-counter sleep aids, bladder control medications, and drugs used to treat the physical symptoms of Lewy Body (tremors, shuffling walk, stiffness in arms or legs) can cause confusion, agitation, hallucinations, and delusions.

And benzodiazepines, common sedative medications to treat anxiety, can cause increased anxiety or worsen cognitive function in people with Lewy Body dementia.

If your older adult is taking any of these medications, speak with their doctor to find out if there are alternatives that are less likely to affect people with Lewy Body, if it can be eliminated, or if the dose can be lowered.

4. Modify their environment
Clutter, noise, and crowds can contribute to the hallucinations and delusions that typically trigger behavioral challenges.

Reducing clutter and minimizing distracting noise, people, or activity can make it easier for someone with dementia to function, reduce their anxiety, and reduce the chance that their eyes will play tricks on them and cause them to become confused or upset about what they think they’re seeing.

5. Use kind, soothing responses to comfort and calm
Someone who has dementia is no longer able to process logic and reason the way we would. Keep them as calm and happy as possible by avoiding conflicts.

Assuming they’re not hurting themselves or others, this means going along with what they say, not correcting or arguing with them, and not quizzing them about what they remember.

If they’re agitated or concerned, validate their feelings and offer comfort through gentle hugs and engaging activities.

6. Create daily routines and keep tasks simple
Routine and simplicity both reduce the chances that they’ll get angry or agitated.

Having clear structure and consistent routine each day reduces uncertainty and confusion and creates a reassuring rhythm to life.

Break down everyday tasks into smaller steps to make them simpler and reduce frustration.

Overall, focusing on successes rather than pointing out failures (and making success possible) boosts self-esteem and positive feelings.

7. Encourage exercise and physical therapy
To help with the physical symptoms of Lewy body, physical therapy options include cardiovascular, strength, and flexibility exercises, as well as gait training.

Working on general physical fitness is also helpful.

Regular exercise also boosts mood, improves physical health, and often reduces aches and pains. All these factors contribute to reducing negative behavior.

8. Consider speech therapy for swallowing problems
If Lewy Body is causing problems with swallowing, that will interfere with nutrition and cause hunger. Neither is good for someone’s mood or health – and it’s natural get “hangry” (hungry + angry) when we’re too hungry.

If that’s happening, consider speech therapy.

Speech therapists teach techniques that make swallowing easier and safer. They also make recommendations on the types and consistency of food and drinks that help with swallowing.

9. Consider alternative therapies
There are a variety of therapies that may help both the person with Lewy Body as well as caregivers.

Occupational therapy may help someone with dementia maintain skills and improve independence and confidence.

Musicart, or can also reduce anxiety, improve mood, and give a sense of accomplishment.

Pet therapy, or using animals to improve moods and behaviors, boosts mood in many people. Caring for a pet, even if the pet is only visiting, can promote a sense of accomplishment and purpose.

Aromatherapy can boost mood and promote relaxation. Massage therapy can loosen stiff muscles, improve circulation, and promote relaxation.

Individual and family therapy or counseling can also be useful for learning strategies to manage emotional and behavioral symptoms. This can also help caregivers learn techniques to keep calm when conflicts come up.

10. Participate in caregiver support groups
Caregiver support groups have many benefits, including hearing from people in similar situations, being able to vent frustrations, and getting tried-and-true advice.

Getting support is essential for helping you stay as calm as possible in tough situations as well as for finding creative solutions to behavior challenges.

What to do if Lewy body dementia symptoms don’t improve

In some cases, non-drug methods aren’t enough to reduce or manage challenging symptoms caused by Lewy body dementia.

When someone’s behavior is aggressive, dangerous, overly disruptive, or significantly impacts their quality of life, additional help is needed.

The best place to start is the doctor who is treating your older adult’s Lewy body dementia. They’re familiar with their health history, current medications, and any past reactions to medications.

If their doctor isn’t able to help and/or the behavior symptoms are severe, a neurologist, geriatric psychiatrist (also called a geropsychiatrist), or geriatrician who specializes in tough dementia cases may be more helpful.

The Facts About Lewy Body Dementia

Lewy Body Dementia

Please help us to help others, spread the word and share our link for Lewy Body Dementia UK.

Without your help and support we can do very little apart from being just another website on the internet, reaching very few people who may need information and help. But with your help, then others who also really need support too can benefit who may not even know we exist.

You can help us to help others, by sharing our link upon your social network platforms or by bookmarking us to share later.

If we can reach just one person or family suffering at this time, then we have succeeded in our aim and purpose, but we would like to reach so many more than just one.

We thank you deeply and sincerely.

Most people mistakenly believe that all types of dementia share similar symptoms, like the hallmark signs of forgetfulness and confusion that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, Lewy body dementia (LBD), the second most common type after AD, is characterized by unique symptoms that make it difficult to diagnose and treat.

It’s important for family caregivers who are looking after aging loved ones to familiarize themselves with some of the basic signs of various age-related diseases like LBD. Noticing strange new behaviors or quirks early on can help ensure a senior gets the medical attention they need in a timely manner.

Facts About Lewy Body Dementia

  1. It affects millions of seniors.
    According to the Lewy Body Dementia Association, LBD affects approximately 1.4 million individuals and their families. Although it is widely unknown, it is the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease.
  2. LBD is not Alzheimer’s disease.
    Many people use the terms “dementia” and “Alzheimer’s disease” interchangeably, but dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a progressive neurological disorder that affects cognitive function, of which there are many different kinds. Alzheimer’s is one form of dementia that is characterized by impaired memory, issues with decision making, trouble with problem solving and difficulty learning new skills.
    There are crucial differences between AD and LBD. For one thing, people with LBD experience unpredictable changes in cognition, regardless of the time of day, whereas people with Alzheimer’s tend to have more trouble in the late afternoon and evening—a symptom known as “sundowning.” Those with LBD also tend to have more visual hallucinations and movement issues, while the hallmarks of AD include memory loss and trouble performing familiar tasks. Furthermore, abnormal alpha-synuclein protein deposits in the brain called Lewy bodies are the hallmark biological marker of LBD, unlike Alzheimer’s, which is caused by the accumulation of beta-amyloid plaques and tau tangles in brain tissue.
  3. LBD is difficult to diagnose.
    As with Alzheimer’s, LBD can only be conclusively diagnosed through an examination of brain tissue after a person has died. However, medical advancements have significantly improved the certainty with which doctors can diagnose living patients.
    Doctors consider the person’s symptoms, interview their family members, perform physical and mental evaluations, obtain a family and personal medical history, and conduct blood tests and brain imaging tests like MRI, PET and CT scans. Symptoms of LBD include problems with depth perception, hallucinations (often visual), delusions, paranoia, Parkinsonism (body stiffness, tremors, trouble walking), and physical issues like heart rate and blood pressure fluctuations, constipation, and fainting spells. To be diagnosed with LBD, an individual must have dementia as well as several of these symptoms.
  4. Medications and LBD can have adverse interactions.
    An accurate, timely diagnosis of LBD is essential to avoiding dangerous medication reactions. Many drugs prescribed to people with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease—especially antipsychotic drugs used to control hallucinations—can have a dangerous effect on people with LBD. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a neurological disorder brought on by a negative reaction to antipsychotic medications that often occurs in people with LBD. Individuals who develop NMS can experience muscular rigidity, high fever, variable blood pressure and severe sweating. Anticholinergic medications, benzodiazepines and over-the-counter sleeping pills can also have negative effects on seniors with Lewy body dementia.
  5. Parkinson’s disease and LBD are very similar.
    People with LBD often exhibit the same symptoms as those with Parkinson’s disease dementia (PDD). While the two conditions start off differently, their biological underpinnings are closely related, and people with Parkinson’s disease can be diagnosed with either PDD or LBD. The factor that physicians use to distinguish between these two conditions is the timing of the onset of cognitive symptoms. People who develop dementia within a year of their Parkinson’s diagnosis are thought to have LBD, while those whose dementia symptoms start beyond the one-year mark are thought to have PDD.
  6. LBD affects sleep quality.
    Sleep issues and dementia often go hand in hand, but there’s a specific sleep condition that appears to disproportionately affect people with LBD. Studies indicate that as many as two-thirds of LBD patients struggle with REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is an ailment that causes movement, speaking and gesturing during the REM (rapid eye movement) stage of sleep, which is usually characterized by paralysis in healthy individuals.
  7. Like most dementias, LBD is unpredictable.
    One of the biggest challenges facing seniors with LBD and their families is the fact that symptoms of the disease tend to worsen and improve erratically. Periods of mental fog, aggressive behavior, movement issues and vivid hallucinations can last seconds, minutes, hours or days. Fluctuations in symptoms can be caused by underlying infections, medications or general progression of the disease. Because of this, it can be nearly impossible to determine how far LBD has progressed in a given individual. However, if the exacerbating factor is capable of being fixed (like a urinary tract infection), then the person with LBD can often return to their prior level of functioning after receiving treatment for the secondary issue.
  8. LBD has no cure.
    There is currently no way to cure or halt the progression of LBD. Instead, treatments are aimed at controlling the cognitive, psychiatric and motor symptoms of the disorder. Those who have been diagnosed with the condition may benefit from palliative care, which focuses on using drugs and nonpharmaceutical treatments to manage symptoms and improve a patient’s comfort and quality of life. For instance, cognitive issues may be addressed with cholinesterase inhibitors, a type of medication that promotes brain cell function by regulating the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. To improve sleep quality and minimize the effects of RBD, careful treatment with clonazepam (Klonopin) or melatonin might be prescribed. Levodopa may be used to mitigate the motor effects of severe Parkinsonism. Occupational, speech and physical therapies are the most common nonpharmaceutical approaches to helping people with LBD manage their condition and maintain day-to-day functionality. Average life expectancy after diagnosis is about 8 years, with progressively increasing cognitive and functional disability.